Day: June 22, 2020

The 5 Most Exciting Things Apple Announced at its Virtual WWDC 2020

The effects of COVID-19, which necessitate social distancing and nationwide stay-at-home orders, are evident even when it comes to press events. On Monday, Apple hosted its first-ever pre-recorded Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC). The stream featured some snazzy camera work, and updates to both Apple software and hardware from CEO Tim Cook, SVP Craig Federighi, and various other Apple employees, including a number of women and people of color, the most ever shown in a single keynote presentation from the company.

Aside from the new faces, Apple went on to highlight the newest features coming to its software for its iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch devices, along with its Apple TV and macOS platforms.

On top of all that, the company announced a long-rumored shift in the hardware that powers its Mac computers—one that echoes a transition it made 15 years ago that set it up for over a decade of

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Apple Watch help with handwashing and a few other things you need to know

Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference, which kicked off with a keynote by CEO Tim Cook on Monday, had a different vibe.

The keynote, which typically serves as a venue for Apple to highlight its latest iOS operating system, was done online only, due to crowd restrictions to combat the spread of the coronavirus.

Cook & Co. unveiled new software updates for iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches and Mac computers – public betas for those will begin in July with final software versions available this fall, Cook said.

The Apple CEO also announced that Apple would begin making its own processors for Macs. The move from Intel chips will make for “a huge leap forward” for Mac computers, he said.

Apple expects to ship the first Mac with an Apple processor by the end of the year, with the transition to all Apple processor-based Macs to take about two years.

New Intel-based Macs

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Sex Therapists Reveal How Quarantine Has Changed Our Sex Lives

The social distancing measures put in place to slow the spread of COVID-19 have shaken up our sex lives, for better and for worse. 

Maintaining that safe 6-foot distance from anyone you don’t live with makes sex — the conventional kind, anyway — all but impossible because of the close physical contact it involves. The virus spreads primarily through respiratory droplets that are emitted when an infected person coughs, sneezes, breathes or speaks. One small study found the virus present in the semen of some COVID-19 patients; however, this does not necessarily mean the virus can be transmitted sexually. 

While people are still encouraged to limit their contact with anyone outside of their household, some public health officials recognize that it’s not realistic to ask folks to remain abstinent over a long period of time. The New York Department of Public Health released updated sex guidelines on June 8 that

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How Gangs and Drug Dealers Adapted to the Pandemic Reality

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As lockdown loomed, most people rushed to buy toilet paper and paracetamol, openly voicing fears of falling ill. But “ill” for addicted drug users has a different meaning. It means to suffer withdrawal symptoms due to missing a regular hit of either heroin or crack cocaine.

While some party people will have stockpiled or bulk bought their lockdown supply of recreational drugs, most heroin and crack cocaine users will have lacked the financial means to do this. My recent book on drug distribution and exploitation in London and the southeast of England, County Lines, revealed how purchasing these drugs is a haphazard, often communal endeavour with daily routines and frustrations.

But demand, at least, is a constant. The gangs that supply these users have had to cope with various new complications to dealing as a result of lockdown, and have had to adjust

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Thousands of community college students withdraw after a lost semester amid coronavirus

Stevie Carpenter, a graduate of L.A. City College, stands in front of the closed campus. Carpenter is planning to transfer to UC Davis this fall, but his withdrawal from an online class could put those plans in jeopardy. <span class="copyright">(Gabriella Angotti-Jones/Los Angeles Times)</span>
Stevie Carpenter, a graduate of L.A. City College, stands in front of the closed campus. Carpenter is planning to transfer to UC Davis this fall, but his withdrawal from an online class could put those plans in jeopardy. (Gabriella Angotti-Jones/Los Angeles Times)

Stevie Carpenter dropped out of high school, earned his GED, enrolled at L.A. City College and at age 25 has been accepted to attend UC Davis this fall, where he plans to study neurobiology.

But the COVID-19 pandemic has thrown another major challenge at him: online classes. Carpenter couldn’t keep up with general chemistry, a requirement for his major.

“I couldn’t take chemistry without a teacher…. It’s difficult to just read a book and go off the examples,” he said.

Instead, he received an “excused” withdrawal, jeopardizing his admission to UC Davis and threatening his plans to become the first in his family of 10 children to attend

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What you need to know from Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference.

Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference, which kicked off with a keynote by CEO Tim Cook on Monday, had a different vibe.

The keynote, which typically serves as a venue for Apple to highlight its latest iOS operating system, was done online only, due to crowd restrictions to combat the spread of the coronavirus.

Cook & Co. unveiled new software updates for iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches and Mac computers – public betas for those will begin in July with final software versions available this fall, Cook said.

The Apple CEO also announced that Apple would begin making its own processors for Macs. The move from Intel chips will make for “a huge leap forward” for Mac computers, he said.

Apple expects to ship the first Mac with an Apple processor by the end of the year, with the transition to all Apple processor-based Macs to take about two years.

New Intel-based Macs

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‘You Step Up and Do It’

For New Orleans emergency nurse practitioner Carolyn Storck, putting others’ needs ahead of her own has always been second-nature — and nothing was going to change that, not even surgery during a pandemic.

Amid the coronavirus pandemic in March, Storck tells PEOPLE she had to undergo surgery after developing a severe case of Achilles tendonitis and a Haglund’s deformity.

Less than two weeks later, Storck — who is in her 40s — was back on the frontlines caring for COVID-19 patients, while also managing to keep the weight off her injured leg during 12-hour shifts by using a hands-free crutch.

“I might just be crazy, but it really did not feel that out of the norm,” she says. “I felt an obligation to my colleagues, and when people started calling out sick and we started looking for back-ups and on-call lists, there still was a gap.”

“If there is a

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BLM protests have flipped the script for influencers used to walking the line between losing followers and political expression. Now, creators say the landscape has shifted.

A chain portrait of George Floyd is part of the memorial for him, Wednesday, May 27, 2020, near the site of the arrest of Floyd who died in police custody Monday night in Minneapolis after video shared online by a bystander showed a white officer kneeling on his neck during his arrest as he pleaded that he couldn't breathe.
A chain portrait of George Floyd is part of the memorial for him, Wednesday, May 27, 2020, near the site of the arrest of Floyd who died in police custody Monday night in Minneapolis after video shared online by a bystander showed a white officer kneeling on his neck during his arrest as he pleaded that he couldn’t breathe.

Jim Mone/AP

  • The resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement following the killing of George Floyd has reached nearly every corner of American life, from physical protests to social media. 

  • Influencers and creators who dominate online spaces — from lifestyle bloggers to YouTube personalities — have been participating in the political conversation more than ever, despite politics being absent from many of their online profiles in the past. 

  • From foodies to YouTube pranksters, influencers of all stripes talked to Insider about how they’ve shifted their content toward social justice, and what

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Toronto enters next stage of reopening, PM cautious to remove international border restrictions

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 101,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,400 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

June 22

1:25 p.m.: Toronto, Peel moves into Stage 2 of reopening

The Ontario government announced Toronto and Peel regions

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Trump in Tulsa Demonstrates Show of Force Against Dihydrogen Monoxide

Photo credit: MANDEL NGAN - Getty Images
Photo credit: MANDEL NGAN – Getty Images

From ELLE

Photo credit: .
Photo credit: .

In Tulsa, Oklahoma on Saturday, in front of a half-empty stadium, Donald Trump drank a glass of water and deeply owned everyone. They said it couldn’t be done in four years and he did it in three and a half, folks. Despite the fact that he claims to not have time to read Twitter, Trump responded to a trend of ableist online derision about the way he drinks water not by critiquing it for its scattershot pettiness, but by accepting it on its merits.

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