Day: July 8, 2020

Keys leaders want restaurants to close a bit early during lobster miniseason

When lobster “miniseason” rolls around at the end of the month, Monroe County leaders plan to have a nightly curfew for restaurants from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. in an effort to stop the spread of COVID-19 in the Florida Keys.

The five county commissioners Wednesday showed no desire to ask the state to cancel the annual two-day event that draws thousands to South Florida, particularly the Keys, to hunt their bag limit of spiny lobster before the regular eight-month season opens Aug. 6.

But they were concerned about crowds filling the streets late at night.

Miniseason is scheduled to take place this year on July 29 and 30. The commission didn’t set the dates of the curfew but suggested it may start the night before miniseason and end the day after regular season starts.

Bars that already serve a lot of food have already closed due to the state’s

Read More

Secret US drug injection site shows how supervision could save lives

<span>Photograph: Rick Callahan/AP</span>
Photograph: Rick Callahan/AP

For five years, a secret supervised drug injection site has operated in the US, allowing drug users to inject more than 10,000 times in a sterile, protected environment.

The illegal operation is modeled after similar, legal sites in Canada and Europe, which seek to provide drug users with a place to get clean supplies, connect with social services and avoid overdosing in a dangerous place.

A study of the underground site published in the New England Journal of Medicine online on Wednesday revealed how lives could be saved if the US were to sanction such facilities.

Related: Secret supervised drug injection facility has been operating at US site for years

At the clandestine site, there were 33 opioid-involved overdoses, which were reversed with the medication naloxone, according to researchers at the not-for-profit RTI International and the University of California, San Diego.

“Not only were the 33 overdoses

Read More

This 60-Second Hack to Make Your Face Mask Fit Better Is Going Viral on TikTok

Photo credit: TikTok
Photo credit: TikTok

From Prevention

  • Dentist Olivia Cuid, M.D., shared a new hack for making your surgical mask fit better.

  • She demonstrated the trick in a TikTok video that quickly went viral.

  • The video was shared and reposted by both Katie Couric and Kristen Bell.

Wearing a mask in public is basically the norm these days (or at least, it should be). But let’s be real, surgical masks aren’t perfect. Namely, they can have a loose fit and allow potentially infected particles to get to your nose and mouth.

Well, dentist Olivia Cuid, M.D., has a hack for making surgical masks fit better over your face, and it’s genius. (BTW: This can work for cloth face masks, too.)

Cuid shared the hack in a TikTok that’s already racked up 395,000 views. With a surgical-style mask, “the sides of your face are left very exposed to the outside,” Cuid points out.

Read More

Get up and moving with this 6-week walk-to-run plan

Running is more than exercise, it’s also a way to get outside and have a separate headspace from the rest of your daily routine. For many people, it’s a great way to spend time alone while working out and, for other people, it can be a way to get involved with a running group or partner up. Whatever your motivation, if you want to start running or haven’t done it in a while, you’re not alone!

This expert advice can get you running regularly in no time and, for those who want to enter an event like a 5K, which is 3.1 miles, you can start celebrating at the finish line in just six weeks.

Many road races across the country have been canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic, but that doesn’t mean you can’t participate in a 5K. Many apps and running clubs offer virtual 5K races — you

Read More

New to running? Don’t make these painful mistakes

Chasing a runner’s high? You’re not alone. With limited access to gyms, many Americans have turned to running as their new primary form of exercise. Running is a great way to get fit, release endorphins and enjoy the outdoors. However, if you’re looking to start running regularly, it’s important to be smart about it. Nick Kafker, a healthy running expert and co-founder of Recover Athletics, estimates that 70% of all runners experience some type of injury each year. Whether you are new to the sport or training for a marathon, get off on the right foot by avoiding these five common running mistakes.

Mistake #1: Running too much

There is nothing quite like the feeling of going for a run on a beautiful day. That feeling can quickly become addictive — leading many people incorporate long runs into their daily routines. While this may work for some, it could be

Read More

Syringes are key to coronavirus vaccine delivery. Trump is relying on two untested suppliers

A syringe is filled with flu vaccine. The expected COVID-19 immunization campaign now hinges on two small companies. <span class="copyright">(Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)</span>
A syringe is filled with flu vaccine. The expected COVID-19 immunization campaign now hinges on two small companies. (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

As the Trump administration races to buy hundreds of millions of syringes for what is likely to be an unprecedented COVID-19 immunization campaign, success depends heavily on two small medical supply companies with little track record of fulfilling government orders of that magnitude.

Retractable Technologies Inc., based in Little Elm, Texas, announced an $83.8-million government contract in May to provide an undisclosed number of syringes and needles for use with a COVID-19 vaccine. In dollar terms, the single order is double the company’s entire 2019 revenue, according to filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Company officials recently warned of possible COVID-19-related supply disruptions due to the fact that 83% of Retractable’s products are made in China, but they also have told shareholders they are confident

Read More

A Q&A with Michael V. Drake

The University of California announced its new president, Dr. Michael V. Drake, on Tuesday. Drake, will oversee 10 campuses, five medical centers, three national laboratories and a nearly $40 billion operation.

History was made, as Drake is the first person of color to serve in this role. He replaces the current UC president, Janet Napolitano, who is stepping down after leading for seven years.

Drake is also taking the reins as the 21st president in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic as students and faculty transition to mostly online instruction for the fall. The university system’s 280,000 students and 227,000 employees face a hybrid set of plans for the fall. Most classes at UC Davis have moved online, but several courses are still being taught in-person.

Drake, who spent much of his childhood in Sacramento and graduated from C.K. McClatchy High School in 1967, spoke with The Sacramento Bee just

Read More

The 20 best things you can buy at Lululemon

These tried and true athleisure pieces are totally worth the price.
These tried and true athleisure pieces are totally worth the price.

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

Lululemon is a store built on athleisure dreams. Yes, a lot of items may be overpriced and aspirational, but if something looks good and performs well, we can’t not recommend it. There’s nothing more iconic than a pair of black Lululemon leggings, and in our opinion, when you look good in the gym, you’ll actually feel more confident about your workout.

Lululemon has a ton of options and they don’t come cheap, so if you’re making an expensive purchase you’re going to want to make sure you’re buying something high-quality that will make your workout feel more comfortable. We scoured the site, read the reviews, and sought out the products we own and love to find the best items you

Read More

US surpasses 3 million cases, hits daily record of 60,021; Ryder Cup postponed 1 year

Hospitalizations continued to rise and ICU beds were quickly filling as the nation surpassed 3 million coronavirus cases Wednesday.

The stunning milestone hit less than six months after the first confirmed case was reported Jan. 21, in Everett, Washington. Tuesday saw a record 60,021 new cases as the nationwide surge showed no signs of ebbing.

The number of new daily cases has risen exponentially since the middle of last month, reaching a record high of 57,209 on July 3. At a Senate hearing last week, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testified that the U.S. is “going in the wrong direction” and that he “would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around.”

The virus has killed more than 130,000 Americans and put a strain on the health care system. In California, hospitalizations are

Read More

Harvard, MIT sue Trump administration over international student visas

Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement over a directive that would prevent international students from studying in the United States on F-1 or M-1 student visas in the fall if their school only offers online classes.

The institutions are seeking a temporary restraining order and an injunction preventing the government from enforcing the directive, arguing, in part, that the administration made the decision to bar international students to pressure institutions to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“The order came down without notice—its cruelty surpassed only by its recklessness. It appears that it was designed purposefully to place pressure on colleges and universities to open their on-campus classrooms for in-person instruction this fall, without regard to concerns for the health and safety of students, instructors, and others,” Harvard President Larry Bacow said

Read More