Day: August 6, 2020

Space Needle Reopens With High-Tech Coronavirus Protections

SEATTLE, WA — The Space Needle has reopened to visitors, and has been outfitted with new tech in an attempt to make the visit as safe as possible.

One of the biggest innovations: organizers say they’ve been able to sanitize the air itself using two types of ultraviolet lights. Using UV-C and Far-UV-C lights, both of which have been proven effective at stopping viruses in the air, they’re set up four new systems to scour the building’s interior of any possible disease vectors:

  • The UV sanitizing entry gate: Entering guests will be asked to spend 20 seconds inside the gate. It shines Far-UV-C light which the Space Needle says will eliminate 90 percent of surface contaminants.

  • New elevator lights: UV radiating lights have been installed in the elevators to make the ride to the top and return trip to earth safer.

  • Air circulation upgrades: UV-C lamps have been installed in

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How Music Could Become a Crucial Part of Your Sleep Hygiene

In the midst of a pandemic, sleep has never been more important—or more elusive. Studies have shown that a full night’s sleep is one of the best defenses in protecting your immune system. But since the spread of COVID-19 began, people around the world are going to bed later and sleeping worse; tales of terrifying and vivid dreams have flooded social media.

To combat sleeplessness, people are turning to all sorts of techniques, including anti-insomnia medication, aromatherapies, electronic curfews, sleep coaches and meditation. But another unlikely sedative has also seen a spike in usage around bedtime: music. While sleep music used to be confined to the fringes of culture—whether at avant-garde all-night concerts or New Age meditation sessions—the field has crept into the mainstream over the past decade. Ambient artists are collaborating with music therapists; apps are churning out hours of new content; sleep streams have surged in popularity on

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COVID-19 testing is helping CVS Health win new customers. But can it keep them?

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Even as the COVID-19 outbreak has chilled consumer spending in the U.S., it’s proving to be a boon for CVS Health, with coronavirus testing helping to buoy the drugstore chain’s soft retail business.

CVS Health said on Wednesday, when it raised its profit forecast for the current fiscal year, that it had administered approximately 2 million COVID-19 tests as of the end of July. And some 40% of people being tested at a CVS pharmacy were new customers. What’s more, most tests were scheduled via the CVS app and websites, likely spurring adoption of such tech tools, which are typically “sticky” and help turn users into loyal customers.

The company has also set up some 1,800 drive-thru testing sites and launched a new business-to-business testing program for corporations

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Nick Cordero’s Wife Opens Up About How Her New Hobby of Tennis Is Helping Through the Mourning Process

Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic Nick Cordero and Amanda Kloots

Amanda Kloots is finding solace in a new hobby one month after her husband, Broadway star Nick Cordero, died from coronavirus complications at the age of 41.

On her Instagram Stories on Thursday, the fitness instructor, 38, opened up about how she’s been experiencing a “hard time” in recent weeks and shared with followers how learning tennis has helped her in the wake of Cordero’s death.

“I just got home from my tennis lesson and I have to tell you, I am just loving it so much,” she said. “I love that I get to leave the house, move my body, sweat, focus and think about something completely new and different. It’s really, really helping me.”

“I had a really hard time lately — the last two weeks especially,” Kloots explained. “These little things do seem to be helping here and there, and

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ENDO Ethos Hemp Store Opens In Huntington

HUNTINGTON, NY — ENDO Ethos, a hemp CBD retailer, is open for business in Huntington Village. CBD, which stands for Cannabidiol, is commonly used for stress and anxiety, pain, sleep and inflammation.

Husband and wife owners Clark and Chrissy Ruggeri held the soft opening of their second ENDO Ethos location on Aug. 1. The 289 Main St. location is in the heart of the village and is a larger space than their flagship Northport shop. The couple signed their lease in November — before the coronavirus outbreak. The pandemic’s harsh impact on merchants made them consider backing out on the lease, Chrissy said. Ultimately, they felt their products would benefit customers at a time some need them most.

“We decided there’s no better time than now, as people are struggling with stress and anxiety, and trying to boost their health naturally,” Chrissy told Patch. “Now we’re trying to build some

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How the sound of religion has changed in the pandemic

<span class="caption">The Rev. Philip Dinwiddie sings to a pre-recording of mass at St. James Episcopal Church in Grosse Ile, Michigan.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/the-rev-philip-dinwiddie-sings-in-his-office-adding-music-news-photo/1220888445?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Gregory Shamus/Getty Images">Gregory Shamus/Getty Images</a></span>
The Rev. Philip Dinwiddie sings to a pre-recording of mass at St. James Episcopal Church in Grosse Ile, Michigan. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

Things sound different in a lockdown. The silence of usually bustling streets, the two-tone whirr of ambulance sirens and the sudden awareness of birdsong, all formed an aural backdrop to the coronavirus pandemic.

Nowhere has the change in sound been more noticeable than at houses of worship. The voices of congregants praying, chanting and singing has been quietened in churches, mosques and temples. Instead, congregants have had to work in new acoustic settings, both in person and online.

In short, religion, too, sounds different during the pandemic. We know this, because we have been documenting the sounds of religious life in America. Over the last six years, our teams of faculty and student researchers at Michigan State University and The Ohio State University have cataloged hundreds of audio

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Teens Found Nonprofit To Make Coronavirus Care Packages

CALIFORNIA — When Sky Yang founded nonprofit Break the Outbreak in March, he had a website and a vision of outfitting essential workers with protective gear.

“Our operations were small at the time, and we had to finance them on our own,” said Yang, a rising senior at Dublin High School in the Bay Area, in an email interview. “Initially, we faced rejections from many restaurants. But we persevered.”

Months later, Break the Outbreak is in the process of expanding to 28 chapters across 14 states, with more than 200 members in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles and elsewhere, organizers said. Members have created and donated more than 2,000 masks to food industry workers stocking shelves and serving up meals.

Break the Outbreak has a strong Bay Area presence, but has expanded in California and across the country, in cities such as New York City and Salt Lake City. The nonprofit’s

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Hillsborough Board Votes To Delay School Reopening 4 More Weeks

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL — Following a five-hour special board meeting Thursday in which a panel of seven medical experts were queried, the Hillsborough County School Board voted 5-2 to delay the reopening of schools for four more weeks.

Board member Karen Perez made the motion and board member Lynn Gray seconded it. School board members Melissa Snively and Cindy Stuart voted against the motion.

That mean that on Aug. 24, the first day of school in Hillsborough County, all public school students will begin school online. Brick-and-mortar school openings will be delayed for four weeks although the school board will reassess the situation at its meeting on Sept. 8.

This vote goes against Florida Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran’s July 6 executive order mandating that all Florida school districts reopen schools five days a week by the end of August in order to receive state funding.

But after listening to medical

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As the Pandemic Rattles the Global Economy, This Beauty Company’s Sales Are Booming

Madison Reed CEO and Founder Amy Errett on running a business that’s thriving, despite (and because of) the pandemic.

The global economy — and retail, in particular — is struggling. With the pandemic bringing uncertainty to virtually every industry, this is a period in which many entrepreneurs are overhauling their businesses, reassessing their priorities and figuring out how to survive. 

For direct-to-consumer, at-home hair color company Madison Reed, though, business is positively booming.

Like Clorox wipes and Purell, it turns out that Covid-19 has created massive demand for DIY hair color options that allow consumers to skip the salon. That’s putting it mildly, if you consider Madison Reed’s recent sales figures: According to a representative, over the past several months, the company experienced 12 times the number of new customers it normally would. In February, Madison Reed sold a Radiant Color Kit every 24 seconds; by May, that stat had

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These online learning tips will help parents prepare for a successful school year, even if it is virtual.

Many of the nation’s largest school districts plan to begin the fall semester online-only. As schools consider reopening, children face a future in which online courses will probably be part of the curriculum. To make the best of this situation, here are some tips to help your child adapt to learning from home.

Studies show that in online learning, parents often take on the role of a teacher. Making school a priority will help keep kids from treating online learning as a vacation. 

Research suggests that some types of parental participation have a greater impact on children’s academic achievement than others. One analysis showed that schoolchildren benefit from discussions about learning and school-related issues with their parents and from joint readings. 

Reduce distractions

A report in 2016 found that students spent about one-fifth of class time on laptops, smartphones and tablets, knowing that doing so could harm their grades. They

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