Health

19 Money-Saving Secrets Target Doesn’t Want You To Know

If you frequently shop at Target, you already know this retailer can help you save money on anything from pillows to Pepsi. With more than 1,800 stores across the U.S., the retail giant has made its reputation as a low-price mecca.

But as easy as it is to save money at Target, those with extra Target intel can save even more. GOBankingRates asked savings experts for money-saving tips to make your Target shopping experience better than ever.

Last updated: Jan. 23, 2020

1. Pick Your Day

Because most Targets mark down certain departments on specific days for clearance, knowing the schedule can help you find the best Target deals.

“For instance, you’ll find the best deals on clearance electronics on a Monday and sporting good clearance on Thursday,” said Christy Palmer, founder of the All Things Target blog.

Here’s a schedule Palmer said is good for most Targets:

Monday: Electronics,

Read More

There is an education crisis hiding behind Covid’s health and economic crises

When the coronavirus pandemic forced schools around the world to stop offering in-person classes this year, more than 1.5 billion kids wound up at home, struggling to learn—with their parents struggling alongside them.

For the online learning nonprofit Khan Academy, which is best known for video tutorials for middle- and high-school math, it was a big moment. Usage of the platform has soared since the onset of Covid-19, from 30 million minutes of learning a day to a peak of 92 million, and an average of 75 million minutes. Registrations for students and teachers increased five to six times; for parents, 10 to 20 times. Engagement for kids who qualify for free and reduced lunch meals has doubled.

“It’s been full-court press here,” says Sal Khan, founder of Khan Academy.

But if shuttering schools and shifting to all-online learning overnight was daunting, so is what comes next. “Once you solve

Read More

Pregnant women in abusive relationships face ‘jail sentences for buying abortion pills online’

200 GPs have signed up to provide abortion services in Ireland, but four counties are still without provision: Getty/iStock
200 GPs have signed up to provide abortion services in Ireland, but four counties are still without provision: Getty/iStock

Pregnant women trapped in abusive relationships who are too scared to get a termination at a clinic due to concerns their partner will find out could face jail sentences for buying abortion pills online, campaigners have warned.

Leading charities are urging the government to change the domestic abuse bill to protect pregnant women living with abusive partners.

A cross-party group of MPs is set to introduce an amendment to the landmark legislation which is currently going through through the House of Commons to decriminalise consensual abortion and bolster the law around non-consensual abortions.

Women living in the UK still face life in prison for an abortion at any stage of their pregnancy without getting the permission of two doctors – with campaigners noting this is “one of the harshest punishments in

Read More

College Roommates Launch Program to Help Essential Workers in Need: ‘Make a Meaningful Impact’

A group of students at Dartmouth College are doing their part to ensure that no frontline worker struggles to obtain essential items during the coronavirus pandemic — one donor match at a time.

Back in March, roommates Amy Guan and Rine Uhm helplessly watched as their spring semester and summer plans crumbled due to the pandemic.

“We ended up losing internships, I lost my in-person graduation, but at the same time, it was hard to be sad about these losses with everything else going around in the world,” Guan, 21, tells PEOPLE. “We would spend a lot of time reading the news and sharing stories that we found interesting about the risks and struggles that essential workers have been facing.”

“The more we read, the more we realized that there was a lack of access to basic necessities that a lot of other people might have lying around their house

Read More

A List Of Mental Health Resources Available For People Of Color

This month is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and right now, access to mental health care for people of color is especially critical. Black people have been watching as a disproportionate number of their loved ones die from the coronavirus pandemic. They’ve watched people who look like them be violently killed or threatened — for nothing more than being Black in public.

Finding a psychologist or mental health worker is difficult for many people. Your health insurance may not cover it. There may be no counselors near you. And Black people face another challenge: In the United States, just 5.3% of psychologists are Black; 83.6% are white. That means that if you’re a person of color searching for a therapist or any other kind of mental health resource, it might be difficult to connect with someone who looks like you.

That’s a problem, since having a therapist of the

Read More

Dearfoams Launches Everyday Hero Sweepstakes, Ben Sherman Donates Masks to Health Care Workers + More

Click here to read the full article.

July 2, 2020: Dearfoams is continuing its celebration of everyday heroes with today’s launch of “Nominate a Hero” — a sweepstakes that invites consumers to nominate a hero of the choice on Dearfoams.com for the chance to surprise them with a free pair of slippers. Nominations, which run through July 15, can include anyone from health-care workers to military service members, parents, teachers, store clerks, and more. According to the company, 200 winning heroes will be selected at random.  “We are so thrilled to continue our heroes’ campaign and commitment to our community by honoring and celebrating all of the heroes in our lives with the new limited-edition Hero Bear capsule collection,” said Tricia Bouras, president of Dearfoams. “We have been so inspired by the overwhelming response the campaign has received these past few months and want to continue honoring those individuals who

Read More

USC reverses robust fall reopening plans, asks students to stay home for online classes

USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Amid the alarming surge in coronavirus spread, USC announced it will no longer bring all undergraduates back to campus for the fall semester and will move to mainly online classes, reversing an earlier decision to welcome students back for a hybrid model.

The decision, announced by Provost Charles Zukoski late Wednesday night, came the same day Gov. Gavin Newsom announced tougher restrictions on indoor activities. Zukoski recommended that students not return to campus for the semester and instead continue their education online.

“The once-in-a-century COVID-19 pandemic has altered every aspect of our lives — the way we interact, work, and socialize — and with each new permutation of the pandemic, we must find ways to thrive,” Zukoski wrote.

“Given the continuing safety restrictions and

Read More

5 Stocks to Make the Most of Growing Technology Dependence

New coronavirus cases in the United States crossed the 50,000 mark on Jul 1, once again raising fear in millions. Fresh coronavirus cases have been on the rise since the economy started reopening and now experts claim that the numbers could further rise in the days to come.

Fears of a second wave of coronavirus are looming already and it won’t come as a surprise if people once again start staying at home. Two months of at-home orders following the coronavirus outbreak have changed the way lives were led in the pre-COVID-19 era. With no signs of the virus receding, life has become a lot more technology dependent and in all likelihood will remain so.

New COVID-19 Cases Hit Record High

On Jul 1, United States recorded a whopping 52,000 new COVOD-19 cases, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. Several states also imposed 14-day quarantines on visitors in the

Read More

Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.
Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Nobu Shiozawa is determined to get customers his restaurant’s homemade tofu and sushi without using delivery apps such as Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash, and Postmates.

That’s not easy these days. Thanks to COVID-19, New York City banned restaurant dining in March. So Shiozawa, who owns and manages in New York City, uses his own small crew to avoid high commissions from the apps, usually .

“If I start using the food delivery service providers during the pandemic, the number of orders and the amount of sales would be increased,” he admitted.

But then he would have to hire more workers to handle the extra orders, which was hard for him to justify with the high fees and the fact he cut more than 60 percent of his staff after the pandemic started.

Image: Nobu Shiozawa

Image:

Read More

California nursing homes got insider access to Newsom’s health care regulators. Here’s how

On April 9, California nursing homes were already in a state of crisis. Employees were staying home, fearing for their safety without proper protection. Facilities reported deaths daily.

At 12:30 p.m. that day, the chief advocate for California’s nursing home industry dispatched an email to officials at the California Department of Public Health. The email listed seven urgent concerns facing nursing homes, including child care and housing for workers.

The most detailed priority on the list: “The continuing bleed of $$$ to respond to COVID.”

“We’ve been working … on getting rate increases but making that happen sooner than later will help,” the industry advocate wrote.

Increased protective equipment for staff members and testing were the final items on the list.

Those priorities came from Craig Cornett, the CEO of the California Association of Health Facilities, an industry group representing 80 percent of the nursing homes in the state.

Cornett’s

Read More