Health

Global health agency urges vaccine safety trials

MIAMI — The Pan American Health Organization has expressed reservations over reports that institutions in the region were negotiating to manufacture and distribute a new COVID-19 vaccine announced by Russia that has yet to go through standard, extensive safety and efficacy trials.

The organization’s deputy director, Jarbas Barbosa, said in an online news conference Tuesday from Washington that any vaccine should be carefully evaluated to ensure the product is safe and effective.

In Brazil, Parana state’s government said it is negotiating with the Russian Embassy to participate in the development of a COVID-19 vaccine, and will be holding a technical meeting Wednesday with Russia’s ambassador.

Nicaragua earlier announced plans to produce a Russian vaccine and on Monday, Vice President Rosario Murillo, wife of President Daniel Ortega, again said the country was in contact with Russian institutions to produce and even export a COVID-19 vaccine.

Barbosa said the vaccine has not

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Karavel Shoes Donates 3D Face Masks to Schools, Famous Footwear and Coach Make Big Donations + More

Aug. 11, 2020: Fashion-comfort retailer Karavel Shoes in Austin, Texas, is doing its part in the prevention of the spread of COVID-19. The family-owned business is in the process of printing 1,200 3D face shields to be donated to staff working in 15 schools located in low-income neighborhoods in Austin. The store also hired three high school students to work on the project. In addition, said Karavel owner Rick Ravel, the store will be selling additional masks to consumers with all proceeds from their sale donated to the Central Texas Food Bank.

Aug. 11, 2020: Famous Footwear has announced a new multiyear partnership with Ticket to Dream, which provides opportunities for foster children across the country. As part of the move, the brand is donating more than 12,000 new pairs of shoes this month to foster kids ahead of the back-to-school season and plans to provide supplies throughout the fall.

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California processing backlog; deadly start to August in Sacramento

The coronavirus is continuing its deadly impact in the Sacramento region, with August already off to a troubling start.

Public health officials, in a Monday update to Sacramento County’s COVID-19 data dashboard, confirmed several more July deaths for nearly 80 in the month, including the deadliest day of the pandemic, and have already confirmed well over a dozen resident deaths from the virus in the first six days of August.

In a breakdown of coronavirus deaths as they’ve occurred by day — as opposed to the dates on which cause of death is made official or is first disclosed publicly — the county now reports a stunning 79 fatalities for the month of July. That’s more than double the previous worst month of April, when 34 died, and over quadruple the 18 observed in each of May and June as the curve of the virus had appeared to be flattening

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Should students get a discount if they won’t be on campus because of COVID-19?

<span class="caption">COVID-19 has caused colleges to spend more to cope with the pandemic. </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/beautiful-young-woman-working-at-home-with-dog-royalty-free-image/1215354586?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:elenaleonova/GettyImages">elenaleonova/GettyImages</a></span>
COVID-19 has caused colleges to spend more to cope with the pandemic. elenaleonova/GettyImages

Not long after the COVID-19 pandemic caused colleges to start teaching remotely, students balked at the idea of paying full tuition for online learning. It’s not hard to understand why. After all, they were not getting the football and basketball games, student clubs, access to labs and the library and the out-of-class conversations that are all part of the typical campus experience.

Although students who study online will not pay the room, board and activities fees that typically cover nonacademic costs, concern about paying full tuition continues this fall, as many universities opt to continue online instruction in the interest of keeping students, faculty and staff safe from the pandemic.

Is it right to expect to pay less tuition for online learning? Or are colleges justified in charging the full tuition price when classes – at least

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HCPS Virtual Learning Plan Approved By Harford County Board Of Ed

HARFORD COUNTY, MD — The Harford County Board of Education approved administrators’ proposal to hold the first semester online while also establishing in-person learning centers. The plan presented by Harford County Public Schools Superintendent Sean Bulson was approved, 8-1.

The dissenting vote came from Tamera Rush, who represents Council District D, which includes the northern part of Harford County.

Approval of the virtual learning plan came after hours of discussion, with board members asking questions of school system leadership on logistics.

While a hybrid model consisting of in-person and virtual instruction had been considered in recent months, Bulson said it would not be feasible to educate the more than 37,000 students enrolled in Harford County Public Schools in that format.

“We were not going to be able to deliver logistically to provide a good instructional program” and deliver on safety, Bulson said.

Coronavirus data in recent months showed an increase

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How Trump and Biden are trying to run virtual campaigns during coronavirus

President Donald Trump’s campaign has ridiculed rival Democrat Joe Biden for remaining cloistered during the pandemic, forced to give speeches, meet activists and raise money almost entirely from the seclusion of his basement in Wilmington, Delaware.

But as precautions and concerns about COVID-19 have grown, Trump has also halted his signature rallies at least temporarily and started his own virtual gatherings to keep in touch with voters.

“They’re making things up on the fly and seeing what works,” said Bob Oldendick, a political science professor at the University of South Carolina. “You use everything that’s available to you.”

Spikes in COVID-19 cases and social distance measures to slow the virus have forced the Trump and Biden teams to adjust their campaigns in ways never seen in history. Rallies, handshakes and traditional grassroots organizing are out. They’ve been replaced with a barrage of email, texts, candidate videos, Zoom meetings and virtual

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How moms are coping right now, from online therapy to forest bathing

Staying at home is a small sacrifice during the coronavirus pandemic, but it’s not without its challenges. How does one ward off loneliness in the absence of community? What can we do to keep anxiety at bay during such an emotionally fraught time? How do we fill the hours stretching out before us, and use this time to make connections, pursue long-neglected hobbies and discover new ones, and inject a little positivity and calm into our everyday lives?

Introducing The Unwind, a new, recurring feature in which Yahoo staffers share the ways we’re finding moments of peace, levity and inspiration during these trying times. From adopting soothing strategies that boost our mental health, to losing ourselves in virtual social calls, newfound passions and other joyous diversions, these are the things getting us through the quarantine. The days may feel uncertain, but beauty and bright spots abound.

As we reach

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID-19 pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic closed campuses this spring compared with fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in 2017 that they had

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Many landmark restaurants, bars won’t reopen after virus

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — La Tropicana Cafe has been a cornerstone of Tampa’s historic Latin-influenced Ybor City neighborhood since the 1960s, well known as a gathering spot where movers and shakers and even mobsters mixed with construction workers over Cuban coffee and sandwiches.

Now its doors are likely closed for good, like so many other bars and restaurants done in by the coronavirus pandemic.

Every neighborhood loses something precious when local eateries and hangouts get shuttered, but as infections spread and the economic fallout continues, the loss of iconic establishments like La Tropicana is particularly hard to swallow.

“In Tampa, if you were a politician, La Tropicana was where you would show up,” said Patrick Manteiga, editor and publisher of La Gaceta, a local newspaper that publishes in English, Spanish and Italian. For years, his father, Roland Manteiga, kept a corner table reserved for himself, with a special red telephone

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Illinois School District’s Remote Dress Code Forbids Students from Wearing Pajamas for Class

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An Illinois school district’s dress code for students choosing to learn remotely amid the coronavirus pandemic doesn’t necessarily want students lounging in their PJs for class.

Under an updated handbook from Springfield Public Schools, students who participate in online classes for the 2020-2021 school year will be subject to the district’s current dress code — which prohibits pajama pants.

The new changes, which also forbids hoods, sunglasses and bandanas, has upset some parents, many of whom believe the no-pajama dress code is a little too strict.

“I made the decision for my kids to be at home, and I don’t really see how any district can come in and say what my kid can’t wear in my house,” parent Elizabeth Ballinger told local news station WCIA. “I don’t think they have any right to say what happens in my house.I think they have enough to worry about as opposed

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