Health

Canada Recovery Benefit unveiled, ‘No value’ in swabbing asymptomatic people, doctors warn

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 6,771 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 134,900 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 24

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‘No value’ in swabbing asymptomatic people, Ontario invests $1B to expand testing

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 6,771 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 134,900 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 24

Read More

Brain Booster Supplements May Have Unapproved Drugs

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Dietary supplements marketed as brain boosters may contain high doses of pharmaceutical drugs that aren’t approved for use in the U.S., according to a study published Sept. 23 in the journal Neurology Clinical Practice.

The team of researchers behind the study analyzed 10 supplements with claims of memory enhancement, sharpened mental focus, and more. All the supplements were purchased online in the U.S. and were openly labeled as containing ingredients that are considered prescription drugs in countries including Russia, China, and Germany.

In three-quarters of the products, labels listed inaccurate quantities of these ingredients. Plus, in some of the supplements, the researchers found other unapproved drugs that were not listed on the product labels, the study found. 

“I have gotten used to the fact that foreign drugs are being sold directly to consumers as supplements,” says Pieter Cohen, an

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These 4 Retail Stocks Make a Great Buy Ahead of Holiday Season

With 2020 inching toward an end, all eyes are on the most crucial part of the year for retailers — the holiday season. But this time around, retailers are bracing for an unusual festive season, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic. There are fears about how comfortable consumers will be in terms of purchasing at a time fraught with high unemployment and lower disposable income. Well, if consumers choose to tighten purse strings, retailers have to tough it out this shopping season.

Nonetheless, Daniel Bachman, Deloitte’s U.S. economic forecaster, said, “While high unemployment and economic anxiety will weigh on overall retail sales this holiday season, reduced spending on pandemic-sensitive services such as restaurants and travel may help bolster retail holiday sales somewhat.” According to a report from CNBC, Deloitte envisions holiday sales between $1.147 trillion and $1.152 trillion, which suggests an increase of 1-1.5% during the November-January period.

Let’s see how

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Racism, police violence and the toll on Black mental health

The drumbeat of it all has seemed never ending.

Ongoing police violence against Black men and women has inflamed racial tensions. A global pandemic has killed Black people in disproportionately high numbers. And these extraordinary traumas come to a community whose mental and physical health already suffer because of anti-Black sentiment.

The suffocation of George Floyd under the knee of a white police officer in Minneapolis ignited a summer of national reckoning on race. Sacramento activist Jamilia Land summed up the anguish: “How do you heal a wound that never closes?”

In the Black community, living with those open wounds comes at a heavy mental and physical cost that researchers and mental health experts continue to assess.

La Tanya Takla, a psychologist and family therapist, focused solely on her private practice in Sacramento this summer as a growing number of African Americans sought her help to cope with the stress

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Swiss university’s undergrads all quarantined

Swiss health authorities have ordered a quarantine for 2,500 students at a prestigious hospitality management school after “significant outbreaks” of the coronavirus that are a suspected byproduct of off-campus partying.

Authorities in Switzerland’s Vaud canton, or region, said all undergraduates at the Ecole Hoteliere de Lausanne, known as the Lausanne Hospitality Management University in English, have been ordered to quarantine both on- and off-campus because the number of COVID-19 outbreaks meant targeted closures were not possible.

School administrators were taking “all necessary measures” to ensure that classes were continuing online, the regional office said in a statement.

University spokesman Sherif Mamdouh said Thursday that the situation was “not ideal” but that the university took precautions in recent months. He said that 11 students had tested positive for the coronavirus and none required hospitalization.

The World Health Organization, national health authorities and others have cautioned that young people have been a

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Why does Germany make so little room for working moms?

It was about six years ago, after the birth of her second child, that Felicitas Sochor quietly began to worry about being called a Rabenmutter.

Ms. Sochor had long dreamed of starting a cafe. But even if she could balance the work commitment that would require with the needs of her two young children, that split time could be seen as the taboo of leaving her children to “fly off to work” as a Rabenmutter, or raven mother.

She settled for an administrative job at a youth center in order to care for her children in the afternoon, with her husband as “the real breadwinner.” But when the pandemic upended her life and shut down the schools, and her husband, working from home, felt it was natural she should take over the child care, she rebelled. “Why do I have to be responsible for everything?” she says. “I

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Beverly Students Make Their Marks In College

BEVERLY, MA — The school year may look a lot of different for college students this fall but there are some Beverly students who are managing to make their mark amid the coronavirus health crisis.

Chrisstopher Morse recently matriculated as a first-year student at Hamilton College. Morse, a graduate of Phillips Academy, was selected from a pool of 7,443 applicants to the college, and joins a class of 470.

Originally founded in 1793 as the Hamilton-Oneida Academy, Hamilton College offers an open curriculum that gives students the freedom to shape their own liberal arts education within a research-and writing-intensive framework.

Hamilton enrolls 1,850 students from 49 states and 49 countries.

Remy Normand serves as a peer mentor for first-year students at the University of Vermont College of Nursing and Health Sciences for the 2020-21 academic year. Known as “LINKS,” mentors provide first-year students with friendship, guidance and a connection to

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These Virtual Mental Health Resources for Black Women Can Make All the Difference

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Cosmopolitan

If you need mental health assistance right now, call the NAMI Helpline at 800-950-NAMI or text “NAMI” to 741741.

Black lives matter, and so does Black mental health. The Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health reports that African Americans are 10 percent more likely to experience serious psychological distress. At the same time, only 30 percent of African American adults with mental illnesses get help each year, which is below the U.S. average of 43 percent.

Racism and racial trauma continue to affect the mental well-being of Black people, who already face so many obstacles when it comes to receiving mental health treatment. As the National Alliance on Mental Illness stated, “Racism is a public health crisis.”

If you feel like the continued incidents of police brutality, the demoralizing legal proceedings like in Breonna Taylor’s case, and the lack of justice for

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What STDs Can Tell Us About How To Fight Covid

As Covid-19 has rampaged across the United States, government officials have struggled with the basic steps needed to contain the pandemic. Should everyone get tested, or just people with symptoms? Should public health officials require Americans to wear masks or not? What’s the best way to track the infection, particularly in marginalized communities?

For one set of public health experts, the heated debates over testing, wearing masks and contact tracing were eerily familiar — as odd as it might seem, these are similar to arguments that officials and academics working to eradicate sexually transmitted diseases have been having for decades as they’ve worked to bring down the rates of infections like HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia.

It may seem incongruous — even inappropriate — to compare a respiratory disease to a sexually transmitted infection. After all, it’s emotionally harder (if logistically easier) for someone to tell a contact tracer who

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