Hospital

Critics say federal agency is where workplace COVID-19 complaints go to die

The complaints have poured in from Florida work sites since the start of the pandemic.

From a Miami prison where staff allegedly weren’t provided proper protective equipment. From a whistleblower at a Panhandle plasma donation center where employees who were visibly sick and awaiting COVID-19 test results allegedly still came into work. From a hospital where nurses treating a patient allegedly weren’t told the patient was COVID-positive.

The complaints go to the federal Occupational Health and Safety Administration, which dutifully maintains a list of the alleged infractions. But it’s unclear how much action is being taken.

OSHA, charged with enforcing health and safety in the American workplace, has received more than 6,000 complaints nationwide about unsafe work conditions related to COVID-19. And yet, on June 9, Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia told lawmakers that OSHA, which his department oversees, had issued just one citation related to the coronavirus — to a

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You can’t reopen Florida schools when thousands of children are infected with COVID

In a blunt and candid response delivered in the midst of a recharged coronavirus crisis sweeping through Florida, Miami-Dade’s Superintendent of Schools confessed that he can’t “guarantee” social distancing when schools open in the fall.

Of course he can’t.

Kids will be kids — and Miami-Dade’s school district is the fourth-largest in the nation.

That’s a heady combination.

Crowded halls. Crowded classrooms. Crowded cafeterias.

“Part of the [reopening] plan relies on increased social distancing, but we cannot guarantee six feet of distance,” Alberto Carvalho said during a virtual School Board meeting to vote on an opening plan for the fall that — thankfully — gives parents options.

Because the times aren’t right for a return to campus at all.

The hot summer months were supposed to bring less coronavirus infection, but the complete opposite has happened. Florida is seeing record numbers of coronavirus cases — not only in the 18-34

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B.C. premier concerned about Americans stopping in the province, 87 per cent of COVID-19 cases in Ontario have recovered

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 102,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,500 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 2

6:50 p.m.: Three flights to Vancouver flagged for possible COVID-19 exposure

The B.C. Centre for Disease Control is

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While vaccines contain human DNA, there is no link to cancer, autism

The claim: A number of vaccines contain human DNA, and the FDA has acknowledged that residual human DNA has the potential to cause cancer or change your genetic code

As scientists race to find a vaccine for COVID-19, mixed information regarding the safety of vaccines is spreading rapidly online.

In an Instagram post, Weston A. Price Foundation shared a photo displaying a quote that says the FDA has “acknowledged that residual human DNA has the potential to cause cancer or to change one’s genetic code.” The quote is attributed to Kendall Nelson, producer of the film “The Greater Good,” which explores the pros and cons of vaccination in the U.S.

The caption states a number of vaccines contain traces of human DNA. The DNA, the foundation wrote, comes from the lung tissue of “a healthy fourteen-week-old aborted Caucasian male fetus” and that spikes in autism in the 1980s and ’90s

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Florida Keys see a daily record for COVID-19 cases and 1 new death. What happens now?

The Florida Keys on Thursday had one new COVID-19-related death and set a daily record for the number of cases reported, as the island chain braces for an influx of tourists for the long Fourth of July weekend.

The Keys reported 26 additional cases of the deadly disease, according to the Florida Department of Health, for a total of 296 cases. Five people along the island chain have died from the virus.

The person who died this week was a 67-year-old man who had “underlying chronic conditions,” according to the health department. It wasn’t immediately known where he had lived in the Keys.

On May 31, the day before the Keys took down two highway checkpoints to keep out visitors, the region had 108 known cases.

Florida also set a new daily record Thursday with 10,109 new cases. The statewide total is 169,106.

“Basically, I shudder,” said Dr. Jack Norris,

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As coronavirus surge continues, L.A. unveils color-coded system to assess infection risk

Customers wearing masks line up to go inside Zara on the 3rd Street Promenade in Santa Monica. <span class="copyright">(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Customers wearing masks line up to go inside Zara on the 3rd Street Promenade in Santa Monica. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

As coronavirus cases continue to mushroom throughout the state, Los Angeles has unveiled a new color-coded system to assess and report the risk of infection.

The online indicator, which Mayor Eric Garcetti unveiled Wednesday, is broken into four categories — red, orange, yellow and green — each representing different threat levels.

“Information and data on the threat helps us all inform our behavior, guides us to better days,” Garcetti said.

As of Thursday morning, L.A.’s indicator was orange, meaning that the risk of infection remains very high, according to Garcetti.

“When the indicator is orange, you want to stay at home as often as possible … and only leave for essential activities like going to work or going to the market,” he said. “And you should assume

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U.S. Cases Rise Most Since May 9; Texas Mask Order: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — U.S. cases jumped the most since May 9 and Florida’s new coronavirus infections rose by a record. Texas ordered residents to wear masks as the state reported its second-most daily infections of the outbreak.

The coronavirus may be mutating in a way that may make it easier to spread, said Anthony Fauci, the top U.S. infectious disease researcher. Houston reported a 4.3% jump in intensive-care patients, and may need to tap extra beds in less than two weeks.

New York City plans to reopen its public schools in September. The U.S. labor market rebound accelerated in June as broader reopenings spurred hiring, though recent virus pickups put the gains in jeopardy.

Global Tracker: Cases pass 10.7 million; Deaths top 518,000Life, liberty and face masks: a virus preys on AmericaRights of American workers could change after virusAn unfestive July 4th as states call off the celebrationsDining out means plexiglass, … Read More

If schools don’t reopen, will parents have to choose between jobs and kids?

With as little as a month before school starts in some areas and COVID-19 diagnoses spiking in some of those same places, parents are wondering whether they have to chose between their jobs and their kids.

“This situation isn’t just untenable, it’s impossible.”

After word reached parents in New York City that the department of education was considering a hybrid plan for reopening schools that would allow students at school for part of the week, Smitten Kitchen founder Deb Perelman tweeted what she later called the “primal scream that we — and countless other parents for whom this situation isn’t just untenable, it’s impossible — have been feeling since March.”

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Perelman said a hybrid reopening plan would leave working parents “ground up in the gears” between reopened cities and closed or partially closed schools.

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“I wish someone would just say the quiet part out loud,” Perelman tweeted. “In

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Amid COVID-19, Trump administration keeps immigration courts open, putting judges, lawyers and immigrants at risk

NEW ORLEANS — A labor union representing the nation’s immigration judges filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the Trump administration, arguing that the government is stifling the judges’ rights to speak publicly on key issues, including the threat of COVID-19 to their lives and to public health.

The judges’ lawsuit is the latest signal of deep distrust between the professionals who work in the nation’s immigration courts and President Donald Trump’s administration. The lawsuit comes as the government moves to reopen immigration courts it had previously closed because of the pandemic. 

Ashley Tabbador, a Los Angeles-based immigration judge who is president of the National Association of Immigration Judges, said the government has released little information on how it makes decisions on opening and closing courts because of coronavirus concerns. 

“If you’re not going to share information and you’re not going to tell us what standards are being used, and you’re essentially

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Does your face mask need a filter? We asked medical experts what to look for

We’re all getting used to wearing face coverings while out and about, and you may have noticed that several masks have a small slot to place a filter for extra protection.

Adding a filter in between the layers of your face mask can help block airborne particles that might sneak through the fabric, and can offer some much need reassurance during these uncertain times.

Luckily, you don’t have to spend a fortune on face mask filters, as there are several budget-friendly options available online. To help you get started, Shop TODAY consulted a few health experts to learn what filter materials are most effective, how often you should swap them out and where you can buy them online.

Why you should use a filter in your face mask

When used in conjunction with social distancing practices, cloth face masks can help slow the spread of coronavirus. However, not all masks

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