COVID19

This Is What 5 Dorm Rooms Look Like In the Midst of COVID-19

Peyton Hanlin, HelloGiggles

As students from colleges all around the country settle into their dorms and get in the swing of distanced learning, it’s clear that 2020 is a year like no other. In light of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many students have returned to school feeling anxious and uncertain. This rings true for all college students.

Freshmen, who also weren’t able to have traditional senior graduation ceremonies, are experiencing college for the first time at a distance, and returning students are comparing their past years to the new normal that’s being enforced now—both in and out of the classroom. To understand how students are setting up their dorm rooms in the year of COVID, we spoke to five students across the country to learn about their unique experiences.

Peyton Hanililn, University of Iowa

Peyton Hanlin, HelloGiggles

While Peyton describes feeling nervous about going back to school, she says that

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Charles Peterson, who scouted for the Cardinals, lost to Covid-19

This fall would have been Charles Edward “Pete” Peterson Jr.’s fourth year as a volunteer football coach at Spring Valley High School in Columbia, South Carolina, and his eighth season as a scout for MLB’s St. Louis Cardinals.

Peterson this year signed third baseman Jordan Walker, the Cardinals’ first-round draft pick.

Peterson had hoped to see his 17-year-old son, Trey, a star outside linebacker, run the field this fall and watch him get offers to play college football.

But in mid-August, Peterson was admitted to Prisma Health Richland Hospital, where he was soon put on a ventilator. He never left the hospital. Peterson succumbed to Covid-19 on Sept. 13. He was 46.

“The last time I spoke to Charles, he was in the hospital,” said one of Peterson’s best friends, Mitchell Moton, another Spring Valley coach. “He said to me: ‘This virus is real. Make sure Trey is OK.'” Moton

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Wisconsin college students take on Covid-19

At one Wisconsin college, students wrote the Covid-19 rules — and they’re enforcing them.

While most universities faced with an explosion of new coronavirus cases gave that job to administrators, Beloit College enlisted 20 students to write up a set of guidelines for navigating life on campus during a pandemic that they’ve dubbed “Behavioral Expectations.”

Rather than simply banning all events and other social gatherings, or shutting down the fraternities and sororities like many schools faced with campus Covid-19 outbreaks did, the Beloit rules recognize that students will be students.

“Faculty and administration do not experience campus life the same way students do, and with COVID-19, we realized students needed to help redefine expectations of campus,” junior Saad Ahsan, the Beloit student government co-president, said in an emailed response to NBC News. “We felt it was important to add behavioral guidelines to reflect the values of the Beloit student body.”

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The stress of COVID-19 on pregnant women and new mothers is showing

<span class="caption">COVID-19 has drastically changed the hospital experience.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/in-this-photo-illustration-a-baby-suckles-a-dummy-whilst-news-photo/56399249?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Daniel Berehulak via Getty Images">Daniel Berehulak via Getty Images</a></span>
COVID-19 has drastically changed the hospital experience. Daniel Berehulak via Getty Images

Pregnancy is stressful, to say the least, but COVID-19 brings new challenges to parents of newborns. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified pregnant women as a vulnerable population. If infected, they are more likely to be hospitalized and require ventilation and their risk of preterm birth goes up.

Economists predict that the U.S. may have at least 500,000 fewer births because of the pandemic. Deciding not to become pregnant during a pandemic is understandable, particularly in the U.S., as it is one of five countries worldwide and the only country classified as high-income by the World Bank, that does not mandate paid maternity leave for non-federally employed workers.

As scholars who study prenatal and postnatal stress, maternal nutrition and the brain development of children, we can tell you the pandemic has dramatically changed the pregnancy

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Parents are wary of giving kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

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Nick Cordero’s widow, Amanda Kloots, on his death from COVID-19

Nick Cordero’s widow, Amanda Kloots, believes her husband’s situation might have had a different outcome if he were to get sick today. She feels the hospital where he was admitted in March, after he fell ill, treated him well, but she notes that health professionals and scientists know so much more about COVID-19 today than they did six months ago.

Nick Cordero and Amanda Kloots married in 2017. (via Instagram)

“It was a different time, and Nick just got trapped,” Kloots told the New York Times in an interview published online late Tuesday. “I think it would be different if he went to the hospital now.”

The 41-year-old Broadway actor died on July 5, after having faced multiple complications in his struggle with COVID-19. He was placed in a medically induced coma, from which he eventually awakened. He also had is leg amputated because of a blood clotting issue.

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Many parents are hesitant to give their kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

Read More

Nick Cordero’s widow Amanda Kloots on his death from COVID-19

Nick Cordero’s widow, Amanda Kloots, believes her husband’s situation might have had a different outcome if he were to get sick today. She feels the hospital where he was admitted in March, after he fell ill, treated him well, but she notes that health professionals and scientists know so much more about COVID-19 today than they did six months ago.

“It was a different time, and Nick just got trapped,” Kloots told the New York Times in an interview published online late Tuesday. “I think it would be different if he went to the hospital now.”

The 41-year-old Broadway actor died July 5, after having faced multiple complications in his struggle with COVID-19. He was placed in a medically induced coma, from which he eventually awakened. He also had is leg amputated because of a blood clotting issue.

Kloots was asked whether she thought Cordero’s situation might have turned out

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Improved Online Portal For COVID-19 Testing: Santa Clara County

SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CA—If you’re looking to get tested for COVID-19, there’s now more lead time offered for scheduling an appointment through an improved online portal, according to county officials.

Appointments can now be made at the rotating city-based sites a week in advance, and five days in advance at the ongoing Santa Clara County Fairgrounds operation. Appointments can be made at www.sccfreetest.org.

Santa Clara County officials are reminding residents with healthcare coverage that large healthcare systems such as Kaiser Permanente, Sutter/Palo Alto Medical Foundation and others are required by county order to offer free testing to members who:

“We are seeing gains through our efforts to keep the community healthy, but with that comes a continued responsibility for individuals to get tested,” said Dr. Marty Fenstersheib, COVID-19 Testing Officer for the County of Santa Clara. “Whether it’s done through healthcare providers or County sites run by Valley Medical Center,

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Surrogate Cares for Baby Months After Giving Birth as COVID-19 Keeps Parents in China

Breana Thomas Photography/Courtesy of Chrislip family Emily Chrislip with her husband Brandon and their son

An Idaho woman agreed to serve as a surrogate for a couple, but the coronavirus pandemic has left her caring for the baby for close to half a year.

Two months before Emily Chrislip was scheduled to give birth, COVID-19 turned into a global pandemic, putting a halt to almost all travel and causing strict restrictions to curb the spread.

But while those travel restrictions were meant to keep people safe, they’ve also become the very thing that has prevented Emily and her husband Brandon Chrislip from handing off the baby girl to her new parents, who currently live in China.

“At first, we thought it would be a max four weeks, and then it kept getting longer and longer,” Emily, 25, tells PEOPLE. “At this point, we’ve just accepted that we don’t know… but

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