COVID19

‘We can’t take our eye off the ball for a second,’ Ford says as Ontario posts record COVID-19 case decline

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 115,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and nearly 8,800 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 29

‘We can’t take our eye off the ball for a second’: Ontario continues to reopen

On Wednesday, Toronto and

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Here’s What the Science Actually Says About Kids and COVID-19

Benjamin Knorr, a 40-year-old single father in Janesville, Wisc., says there’s about a 50-50 chance he’ll send his two teenage sons back to school this fall. His 13-year-old, Aiden, would especially like to get back to his friends, sports, and regular life. But Knorr, an independent contractor, has asthma, and fears that his health and finances would be imperiled if one of his boys brought COVID-19 home from school.

“If the numbers go up in Dane County and Rock County, where I work and live, it’s over. We’re just doing the online school,” Knorr says. “We already got through two months of it, and yeah, it was hard. It was stressful. And yeah, it was more work on my part to come home and do the online schooling with them and stuff. But we can’t be homeless.”

As school districts across the United States decide whether to welcome kids back

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Military Doctors Are Adapting Tools Designed for Combat Zones to Fight COVID-19

A tracking system developed to monitor and treat wounded troops in Iraq and Afghanistan has proven invaluable in the U.S. military’s fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, defense health officials said Monday.

The Defense Department’s Joint Trauma System, created in 2004 to collect information on casualties, treatments and outcomes to determine what worked — or didn’t — in saving lives in combat, is being used during the pandemic to gather real-time data on COVID-19 patients, according to Dr. Paul Cordts, chief medical officer at the Defense Health Agency.

Read Next: Military Stolen Valor Cases on the Rise, Investigators Say

The information is leading to more widespread use of effective treatments, Cordts said.

As of Monday, the DoD has had 36,659 total cases of COVID-19, including 960 hospitalizations and 56 deaths, since the first military patient was diagnosed with the illness Feb. 24 in the Republic of Korea.

With the need for

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What Recovery From COVID-19 Is Really Like, According To Women Who’ve Had It

For the past six months, most of our attention has been focused on how to avoid catching COVID-19, and how to help the people who do contract it survive. What’s getting less attention is what happens after you’ve recovered from the disease. But as of press time, 2,153,726 people have recovered from coronavirus. And many are experiencing unexpectedly long-lasting and intense symptoms.

“This is a very real issue,” says Paul Pottinger, MD, director of the Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine Clinic at the UW Medical Center. “Infectious disease doctors around the country have known for a long time that certain viral infections can do this. It’s not unique to COVID, which is good news — it gives me hope.”

While there are no official figures yet on how common persistent symptoms of coronavirus are, Dr. Pottinger says that one in four people who’d had the SARS-CoV-1 virus (which is similar

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Colleges are increasingly going online for fall 2020 semester as COVID-19 cases rise

Call it coronavirus déjà vu. After planning ways to reopen campuses this fall, colleges are increasingly changing their minds, dramatically increasing online offerings or canceling in-person classes outright.  

This sudden shift will be familiar to students whose spring plans were interrupted by the rapid spread of the coronavirus. Now, COVID-19 cases in much of the country are much higher than in the spring, and rising in many places. 

In many cases, the colleges had released plans for socially distant in-person classes only a few weeks ago, hoping to beat the coronavirus.

“Instead,” said Robert Kelchen, a professor of higher education at Seton Hall University, “the virus beat us.”

Just as in the spring, students have been left scrambling to adjust their class schedules and living arrangements, faced with paying expensive tuition for online classes and rent for an apartment they may not need. Digital classes are still unappealing to many,

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Are Face Shields Better Than Face Masks For Protection Against COVID-19?

As the coronavirus pandemic rages on, people are looking for ways they can protect themselves and others from infection.

While cloth facial coverings are now ubiquitous in many parts of the country, clear plastic face shields have been slower to catch on with the public. (The gear is most commonly worn in health care settings, on top of a surgical mask or N-95 respirator). But interest seems to be growing: Google Trends data shows a large spike in searches for the term “face shields” over the last two months. And the new curiosity about face shields has raised questions about how well they protect against COVID-19.

First, know that the novel coronavirus is thought to be spread mainly through the respiratory droplets produced when an infected individual coughs, sneezes or speaks. Transmission primarily occurs during close person-to-person contact and, less commonly, via contaminated surfaces. Now some experts say it may

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Twitter removes tweet highlighted by Trump falsely claiming COVID-19 ‘cure’

WASHINGTON — Twitter removed a tweet that had been retweeted by President Donald Trump that falsely said that there was a cure for the coronavirus.

Late Monday night, Trump retweeted the tweet from an account with the handle “@stella_immanuel” that said: “Covid has cure. America wake up.”

Twitter soon after removed the tweet and replaced it with a gray box that says, “This Tweet is no longer available.”

A cure for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, doesn’t exist and scientists have been working on developing both a range of treatments as well as vaccines. They and the Trump administration are racing to have a vaccine ready by the end of the year.

Twitter said early Tuesday morning, “Tweets with the video are in violation of our COVID-19 misinformation policy.”

Trump also retweeted tweets defending the use of the drug hydroxychloroquine, including one that accused Dr. Anthony Fauci, a

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Health Canada authorizes first COVID-19 treatment drug

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 114,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and nearly 8,800 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 28

11:15 a.m.: Health Canada authorizes first COVID-19 treatment drug

Health Canada has authorized the first drug for COVID-19 treatment.

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In The COVID-19 Era, Kids Sports Won’t Be The Same For A Very Long Time

Up to 45 million kids in the United States participate in some kind of organized sports, and for many of them, that participation is…everything. Sports are fun, they can be good for developing brains and bodies, and they can teach kids about hard work, resiliency and emotional control. 

Unfortunately, youth sports have so far been another casualty of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic — and many families are wondering what comes next. For the high school student who has practiced for decades but won’t get that final season, or the elementary schooler who counts on her teammates as an emotional lifeline, not being able to play is a very, very big deal.  

So HuffPost Parents spoke to several experts about what to expect in the upcoming year, as well as what parents who are weighing resuming their kids’ lessons or putting them back on teams (if that’s an option) should keep

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Tips for boosting your child’s mental health during COVID-19

As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on and families spend more time at home, adjusting to “the new normal” may prove especially difficult for younger children as they gear up for the school year — especially those learning remotely.

While experts are still learning about how the pandemic could affect children’s long-term mental health, they have tips for parents now on supporting their children during these unprecedented times.

1. Maintain a daily routine

“The structured routine is really big” and “firm sleep times” are very important, said Dr. Anju Hurria, a child psychiatrist at the University of California, Irvine.

“I’m often finding myself recommending to parents to create the actual schedule,” said Dr. Kevin Simon, a senior child and adolescent psychiatry fellow at Boston’s Children Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

PHOTO: A woman and two children wear masks at a playground, July 11, 2020, in Los Angeles. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP, FILE)

Both

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