experts

Thinking about going to the dentist? Experts say it’s OK in areas of low COVID-19 transmission

The CDC advises dentists to “prioritize the most critical dental services and provide care in a way that minimizes harm to patients from delaying care and harm to personnel and patients from potential exposure” to COVID-19. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images)
The CDC advises dentists to “prioritize the most critical dental services and provide care in a way that minimizes harm to patients from delaying care and harm to personnel and patients from potential exposure” to COVID-19. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images)

The World Health Organization (WHO) has taken a strong stance on oral health, urging people to put off routine visits to the dentist when COVID-19 is heavily circulating in their area.

In interim guidance published on Aug. 3, the WHO specifically advises that “routine non-essential oral health care — which usually includes oral health check-ups, dental cleanings and preventive care — be delayed until there has been sufficient reduction in COVID-19 transmission rates from community transmission to cluster cases or according to official recommendations at national, sub-national, or local level.” This recommendation also applies to “aesthetic dental treatments,” the guidance says. However, the organization adds,

Read More

The hybrid learning model for schools reopening is ‘imperfect on many levels,’ experts say

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES - 2020/08/03: A protester holds a placard that says No return until zero cases during the demonstration. (Photo by Ron Adar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES – 2020/08/03: A protester holds a placard that says No return until zero cases during the demonstration. (Photo by Ron Adar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

While some schools across the country have already reopened their doors to students and staff, it’s crunch time for other states and school districts to decide what learning will look like in their areas this fall. And pandemic school models vary wildly.

Chicago Public Schools officials announced on Wednesday that the city’s schools will be fully remote until “at least” November 6. In a series of tweets, school officials shared graphics that featured the headline, “Families Not Yet Ready to Return to Classrooms,” noting that many district families are hesitant to do in-person schooling. 

Read More

Experts Say Knowing Your Blood Type May Help Reduce Your Risk for Many Diseases

Photo credit: MirageC - Getty Images
Photo credit: MirageC – Getty Images

From Good Housekeeping

Blood can play a huge role in your health, and yet many don’t know their blood type — or haven’t even discussed the topic with a doctor. A 2019 survey by Quest Diagnostics, a clinical laboratory company, found that 43% of Americans don’t know their blood types. “Most people actually don’t know their blood type unless they’ve had some type of procedure done or a recent visit that required a blood type [test],” explains Tiffany Lowe-Payne, DO, a North Carolina-based osteopathic family physician, who also serves as an assistant professor at Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine.

But a recent revelation in research during the novel coronavirus pandemic has people suddenly very interested in understanding which kind of blood pumps through their veins. According to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine in June, data suggests that people

Read More

31 Simple Ways Experts Stay Resilient, Hopeful, And *Happy* During The Toughest Times

Photo credit: D’Ara Nazaryan
Photo credit: D’Ara Nazaryan

From Women’s Health

  • This year’s been a doozy for your mental health, no doubt. Enter: the WH coping manual to help you survive and thrive through any emotional disaster (as well as the small stuff you still sweat)…and crush it every step of the way.

How are you? Seriously, check in with yourself. What was the answer? “Fine”? “Not great, but I don’t want to complain because people have it worse”? “Ready to blast off to space”? It’s no secret that 2020 has felt like an active volcano, in which spewing news cycles are followed by simmering states of despair.

Now for the good: There’s a ton of actions you can take to Keep. Moving. Forward. So fantasize for a minute here. If you want to learn to play tennis, you’d (in an alternate universe) call Serena Williams. Biz advice? You might go to Sheryl Sandberg.

Read More

Conspiracy theories around COVID-19 continue to spread. Experts weigh in on why people believe them.

More than 200 people gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus to protest the face mask mandate that multiple counties are under in the state. (Photo: Megan Jelinger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
More than 200 people gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus to protest the face mask mandate that multiple counties are under in the state. (Photo: Megan Jelinger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

When Texas Rep. Louie Gohmert, a Republican who has publicly shunned face masks, tested positive for COVID-19 on Wednesday, the news sparked a chain reaction. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced new rules that required lawmakers to wear masks on the House floor, and several members of the House revealed that they were planning to go into quarantine. 

Soon after, Gohmert released a video on Twitter, revealing that he is asymptomatic. He then shared a conspiracy theory about wearing masks that, apparently, he also believes. Gohmert said he “can’t help but wonder” if he contracted COVID-19 from adjusting his mask with his hands. “It is interesting, and I don’t know about everybody, but when I have a mask

Read More

Why are Arizona casinos still open despite experts saying they’re high-risk during COVID-19 spike?

Plexiglas is placed around slot machines, gaming tables, and other areas at the Lone Butte Casino in Chandler on May 14, 2020. Casinos under the Gila River Indian Community were planning to reopen during the COVID-19 pandemic with new safety measures on May 15, 2020.
Plexiglas is placed around slot machines, gaming tables, and other areas at the Lone Butte Casino in Chandler on May 14, 2020. Casinos under the Gila River Indian Community were planning to reopen during the COVID-19 pandemic with new safety measures on May 15, 2020.

Movie theaters across Arizona are empty.

Gyms have locked their doors.

And restaurants are filled with taped-off tables, welcoming half of the customers they would usually see for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

But casinos, which operate on tribal land in Arizona, are open for business, despite health experts warning that customers are engaging in a high-stakes gamble: risking their health along with their money.

Casinos are the only business designated as high-risk by Arizona’s health department that remain unrestricted amid the recent COVID-19 spike in the state.

But some public health experts say they shouldn’t be. Dr. Shad Marvasti, director of public health at the

Read More

Can You Get COVID Again? It’s Very Unlikely, Experts Say

Megan Kent near her home in Salem, Mass., on July 17, 2020. (Kayana Szymczak/The New York Times)
Megan Kent near her home in Salem, Mass., on July 17, 2020. (Kayana Szymczak/The New York Times)

The anecdotes are alarming. A woman in Los Angeles seemed to recover from COVID-19 but weeks later took a turn for the worse and tested positive again. A New Jersey doctor claimed several patients healed from one bout only to become reinfected with the coronavirus. And another doctor said a second round of illness was a reality for some people, and was much more severe.

These recent accounts tap into people’s deepest anxieties that they are destined to succumb to COVID over and over, feeling progressively sicker, and will never emerge from this nightmarish pandemic. And these stories fuel fears that we won’t be able to reach herd immunity — the ultimate destination where the virus can no longer find enough victims to pose a deadly threat.

But the anecdotes are just that

Read More

Nearly 3,500 Public Health Experts Sign Letter Defending Fauci Amid White House Attacks

Nearly 3,500 public health experts sent an open letter to President Donald Trump amid a spate of attacks launched over the last two weeks at Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, calling those seeking to undercut him a “dangerous distraction.”

In the letter, which was organized by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the group calls the coronavirus pandemic “one of the greatest challenges the United States has faced in its history.” But the signatories, which include two previous heads of the Food and Drug Administration, a former U.S. surgeon general and a former secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, said they were troubled by efforts to smear Fauci, who they said has provided a clear voice to Americans during the health crisis.

“Since the beginning of the pandemic, he has remained one of the world’s most trusted scientists on COVID-19, daily

Read More

What “Self-Care” Means Right Now, According To Experts

These days, your energy is spread pretty thin. Between social distancing, sanitizing your groceries, supporting local businesses, showing up to protests, emailing politicians, signing petitions, and donating to campaigns, it’s likely your days are busier than ever. You’ve got an ever-expanding laundry list of “shoulds” to tackle. And in the shuffle, you’ve probably forgotten to find windows to take care of yourself. And no, “self care” is not all bubble baths and face masks. 

“I think of self-care in various domains such as psychological, physical, professional, and personal.” says Dr. Rebecca B. Skolnick, co-founder of MindWell NYC and a licensed clinical psychologist. Maybe it’s a long run, a midday nap between Zoom calls, an elaborate home-cooked meal, or a pint of Halo Top in bed. Particularly right now, as we are adapting to new ways of living every day, we simply can’t put “self care” in a box. And as

Read More

As debate rages, many public health experts say children should return to school

BALTIMORE — In the raging national debate over whether to reopen schools, advocates on both sides are basing their arguments on a range of factors: political, economic and emotional.

But there is a growing consensus in the public health and scientific community that schools should resume in-person classes this fall — particularly in states such as Maryland, where cases have not spiked as they have elsewhere.

To be sure, these experts say safety precautions will be necessary to reopen schools. But they say an assessment of risks versus benefits points to the wisdom of reopening.

The latest available data suggests that children are less likely to become infected with the coronavirus and less likely than adults to develop severe cases. In addition, health experts say children appear not to spread the virus to family members and other adults as efficiently as flu and other common illnesses.

While public health experts

Read More