Health

There is an education crisis hiding behind Covid’s health and economic crises

When the coronavirus pandemic forced schools around the world to stop offering in-person classes this year, more than 1.5 billion kids wound up at home, struggling to learn—with their parents struggling alongside them.

For the online learning nonprofit Khan Academy, which is best known for video tutorials for middle- and high-school math, it was a big moment. Usage of the platform has soared since the onset of Covid-19, from 30 million minutes of learning a day to a peak of 92 million, and an average of 75 million minutes. Registrations for students and teachers increased five to six times; for parents, 10 to 20 times. Engagement for kids who qualify for free and reduced lunch meals has doubled.

“It’s been full-court press here,” says Sal Khan, founder of Khan Academy.

But if shuttering schools and shifting to all-online learning overnight was daunting, so is what comes next. “Once you solve

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A List Of Mental Health Resources Available For People Of Color

This month is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and right now, access to mental health care for people of color is especially critical. Black people have been watching as a disproportionate number of their loved ones die from the coronavirus pandemic. They’ve watched people who look like them be violently killed or threatened — for nothing more than being Black in public.

Finding a psychologist or mental health worker is difficult for many people. Your health insurance may not cover it. There may be no counselors near you. And Black people face another challenge: In the United States, just 5.3% of psychologists are Black; 83.6% are white. That means that if you’re a person of color searching for a therapist or any other kind of mental health resource, it might be difficult to connect with someone who looks like you.

That’s a problem, since having a therapist of the

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Dearfoams Launches Everyday Hero Sweepstakes, Ben Sherman Donates Masks to Health Care Workers + More

Click here to read the full article.

July 2, 2020: Dearfoams is continuing its celebration of everyday heroes with today’s launch of “Nominate a Hero” — a sweepstakes that invites consumers to nominate a hero of the choice on Dearfoams.com for the chance to surprise them with a free pair of slippers. Nominations, which run through July 15, can include anyone from health-care workers to military service members, parents, teachers, store clerks, and more. According to the company, 200 winning heroes will be selected at random.  “We are so thrilled to continue our heroes’ campaign and commitment to our community by honoring and celebrating all of the heroes in our lives with the new limited-edition Hero Bear capsule collection,” said Tricia Bouras, president of Dearfoams. “We have been so inspired by the overwhelming response the campaign has received these past few months and want to continue honoring those individuals who

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California nursing homes got insider access to Newsom’s health care regulators. Here’s how

On April 9, California nursing homes were already in a state of crisis. Employees were staying home, fearing for their safety without proper protection. Facilities reported deaths daily.

At 12:30 p.m. that day, the chief advocate for California’s nursing home industry dispatched an email to officials at the California Department of Public Health. The email listed seven urgent concerns facing nursing homes, including child care and housing for workers.

The most detailed priority on the list: “The continuing bleed of $$$ to respond to COVID.”

“We’ve been working … on getting rate increases but making that happen sooner than later will help,” the industry advocate wrote.

Increased protective equipment for staff members and testing were the final items on the list.

Those priorities came from Craig Cornett, the CEO of the California Association of Health Facilities, an industry group representing 80 percent of the nursing homes in the state.

Cornett’s

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Cornell says in-person learning is best for public health

As colleges around the country grapple with how to reopen in the fall, Cornell University’s president on Tuesday announced that it will welcome students back to campus — an option she said is best not only for their education, but also public health.

The Ivy League university decided that compared with holding classes only online, residential learning would be safer for students and the wider community because it can ask students to participate in a screening program to detect and contain any spread of the coronavirus, President Martha Pollack said.

“The key consideration in our decision to reopen is public health,” Pollack said in a statement.

In contrast, many other universities around the country, citing concerns for the health of students and faculty, have developed plans to bring smaller numbers of students to campus or emphasize online instruction. Dozens of others have announced plans to reopen with modifications to campus

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Restaurant Co-Owner Cites Husband’s Mental Health After He Refuses Black Customer in ‘I Can’t Breathe’ Shirt

A number of people assembled outside a Maryland restaurant on Sunday after a customer said he wasn’t permitted inside because he was wearing a shirt that said “I can’t breathe,” a reference to George Floyd and others who have been killed by the police.

Located in Prince George county, protestors called for the Fish Market to shut down for the day, Fox 5 reports. The community was outraged after customer Daryl Rollins, who is Black, shared his experience online. He explained that on Friday, one of the owners, Rick Giovannoni, wouldn’t let him inside the restaurant when he saw Rollins’ shirt.

“He came over and told me, ‘Why do you have that shirt on? I seen the video. It was terrible. Why would you wear that shirt? You cannot come into my establishment like that,’” Rollins said. He said the owner was likely referring to the video of Floyd’s death,

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local health officials say they have been left in the dark on spread of coronavirus

PA
PA

The government’s new lighthouse laboratories were designed to be able to centralise data on the frontline of the fight against coronavirus – but multiple public health directors say they are still being denied postcode-level and specific patient data for positive tests.

Speaking to The Independent as part of our investigation into the UK’s coronavirus expansion, several said they had been informed about clusters of outbreaks by local media rather than via the NHS test and trace service because key details such as where a person works, or their place of worship, were not routinely recorded.

Summary level information from testing carried out by the Lighthouse Labs, pillar two of the government’s testing strategy, was not made available until earlier this month and provides only aggregate totals.

Public health officials said they had been “encouraged” not to publicly criticise the Lighthouse Labs or NHS Test and Trace, which launched at

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‘Brandon Act’ Would Give Troops a Safe Word to Access Mental Health Care

Former Marine and Iraq War veteran Rep. Seth Moulton introduced a bill in Congress on Thursday that would make it easier for service members to seek mental health care outside their chain of command.

The Brandon Act, named for Navy Aircrew Aviation Electrician’s Mate Striker Brandon Caserta, who died by suicide two years ago this week in Norfolk, Virginia, would give service members a safe word that would trigger an immediate automatic referral to a mental health specialist for evaluation.

Read Next: Bill Would Create New Dangerous Dog Rules for Military Bases

According to the bill, H.R. 7368, if a service member uttered a selected phrase, it would trigger a referral “as soon as practicable” and in a confidential manner similar to the restricted reporting option available to victims of sexual assault in the U.S. military.

Moulton, a Massachusetts Democrat who has spoken openly about his own struggles with post-traumatic

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World of Outlaws full-crowd events will have high-tech health screening, rapid COVID-19 testing on site

After becoming the first national motorsports series to race again during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the World of Outlaws will become the first to race with full grandstands.

And in holding a July 2-4 holiday extravaganza at Cedar Lake Speedway in New Richmond, Wisconsin, the Outlaws will roll out a sophisticated health screening system relying on biometrics, algorithms and rapid COVID-19 testing on site to help usher in a crowd expected at more than 20,000 over the three days.

Details of the plan, which was constructed with IMPACT Health, Soter Technologies and NEXT Marketing, were unveiled Friday – and could be the blueprint for future attempts of conducting pro sports events at full capacity during the COVID-19 era.

“It’s definitely ambitious, but we believe we have the team and the process in place to keep everybody as safe as possible – as safe as they’ll be in a sports

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Can Personalized Vitamins or Supplements Improve Health and Performance?

Photo credit: FotografiaBasica - Getty Images
Photo credit: FotografiaBasica – Getty Images

From Bicycling

As cyclists, we tend to be healthier than the average person, thanks to logging miles on the road, trainer sessions, and focusing on fueling workouts with smart nutrition choices. (That’s not to say we don’t indulge after a hard effort or once we cross the finish line of a goal race.) But because of this focus on nutrition, dietitians often tell cyclists to aim for whole foods—if we “eat the rainbow,” there’s really no need to supplement with vitamins.

And while that’s generally true, for some, there is a time and place when it might be beneficial to explore adding a vitamin or mineral supplement. When it comes time to choose one, it can be downright confusing, especially now that companies are rolling out “personalized” vitamins or pill packs that are catered to a specific person.

We spoke with two dietitians on

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