Hospital

Court Ruling on Price Transparency Unsettles Hospital Stocks

On Jun 23, the Federal court verdict upheld The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)  plan on Improving Price and Quality Transparency in American Healthcare, which went against the American Hospital Association (AHA).

The essence of the ruling is to disclose publicly the prices negotiated between hospitals and insurers in order to promote competition and reduce costs.

The Rules at a Glance

The set of rules requires hospitals to make the negotiated rates they charge insurers for medical services and prescription drugs available in the public domain. It also directs hospitals to make prices for healthcare services, such as common tests and procedures, available online beginning 2021. Hospitals will display the price band of shoppable services as a total package in an easy-to-read, consumer-friendly format.

The proposal also requires insurance companies offering group and individual coverage to provide cost estimates for enrollees up front so that patients are

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Expert explains current hospital guidelines

The easing of lockdown restrictions in England has meant that shops can begin re-opening and people can start to go back to work, albeit with strict social distancing rules in place.

As life partially returns to some normality, what does this mean for pregnant women and their birth partners?

At the height of the pandemic, partners were only allowed to be present during the very last stage of labour with strict rules in place.

But now lockdown’s easing, so are some hospital guidelines.

Read more: Sleep expert debunks newborn myths

Dr Brooke Vandermolen, who runs online antenatal classes at The Birth Collective, explains what the latest update means for pregnant women and their partners.

Dr Vandermolen confirmed that the current guidelines differ region by region, depending on a number of factors.

During the height of the pandemic, partners were not allowed. (Getty Images)
During the height of the pandemic, partners were not allowed. (Getty Images)

You’ve probably noticed that the rules around

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INSIGHT-Billions in COVID relief go to biggest hospital chains as smaller rivals await aid

By Chad Terhune

June 9 (Reuters) – Spared the worst of COVID-19, the largest for-profit hospital chains in the United States are pursuing a speedy recovery backed by billions of dollars in federal aid, while other hospitals say they have been harder hit and left wanting.

HCA Healthcare Inc, the biggest chain, has received $5.3 billion in loans and grants thus far from the federal government to offset lost business and higher expenses from the coronavirus pandemic. Tenet Healthcare Corp, the second-largest chain by revenue and beds, has disclosed more than $2 billion in similar loans and grants.

Meantime, the two chains, which own hundreds of hospitals, outpatient surgery centers and clinics, are telling investors that COVID-19 wasn’t as severe as expected in most of their markets, and that business is ramping back up. Shares in Tenet have doubled since the market lows in mid-March, while HCA shares have soared

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Florida committed $283 million to adding hospital beds. Then they weren’t needed.

Gov. Ron DeSantis has chastised the media for quoting public health modelers who predicted the state would run out of hospital beds for COVID-19 patients if he didn’t issue a statewide stay-home order in April. But the governor’s emergency managers, using those same models, were so concerned about a hospital shortage that they signed $283 million in no-bid deals to build alternative hospitals to hold the overflow, a Herald/Times analysis has found.

One of those hospitals, the now-shuttered Pan American Hospital near the Miami airport, received the heftiest of the offers: a $42 million-a-month agreement to repair, lease and operate a 200-bed facility to house COVID-19 patients. The deal to use Children and Family Hospital, as it was being called, was put together by Alex Heckler, a Miami lawyer who is a Democratic Party operative and close friend of Division of Emergency Management Director Jared Moskowitz.

The purchase order was

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Trump and Congress tried to make coronavirus testing and treatment free, but people are still getting big bills when they go to the hospital

The Trump administration set up a fund for the uninsured. But Imad Khachan, a coronavirus patient who is uninsured, received a large medical bill after a hospital stay.
The Trump administration set up a fund for the uninsured. But Imad Khachan, a coronavirus patient who is uninsured, received a large medical bill after a hospital stay.

Courtesy Imad Khachan

  • Congress and the Trump administration tried to protect coronavirus patients from getting large medical bills, but problems are popping up. 

  • Two patients who tried to get treatment for coronavirus symptoms didn’t get tested, but still received large medical bills. 

  • One uninsured patient living in New York City got a nearly $50,000 bill after a three-night hospital stay for coronavirus care. 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

David Anthony in New Jersey received a $1,528.43 bill for a chest X-ray.

Lindsay Hill in Milwaukee spent 30 minutes in a triage tent and later received a $1,186 bill in the mail.

Imad Khachan from New York City received a bill for nearly $50,000 after a three-night hospital stay. 

Patients who

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Coronavirus fake news causing patients to refuse hospital admission, medics tell MPs

Patients have been 'afraid' to come to hospital and are instead trying 'alternative remedies' they have read about online - AFP
Patients have been ‘afraid’ to come to hospital and are instead trying ‘alternative remedies’ they have read about online – AFP

Coronavirus patients are refusing to be admitted to hospital because of fake news messages on WhatsApp saying doctors will kill them, frontline medics have warned MPs.

Dr Megan Emma Smith, a senior consultant anesthetist, said she was seeing patients arrive at hospital “unbelievably sick” because social media misinformation had frightened them into not coming or into trying quack remedies instead.

Appearing before the culture select committee on Thursday, a 111 operator also warned that misleading posts about Covid-19 had “eroded” public trust in the NHS and said he was having to convince callers that doctors and nurses were “on their side”.

The comments came as MPs investigated the impact of fake news during the pandemic and what measures social media giants are taking to suppress potentially deadly misinformation.

Dr

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Billions in COVID relief go to biggest hospital chains as smaller rivals await aid

By Chad Terhune

(Reuters) – Spared the worst of COVID-19, the largest for-profit hospital chains in the United States are pursuing a speedy recovery backed by billions of dollars in federal aid, while other hospitals say they have been harder hit and left wanting.

HCA Healthcare Inc, the biggest chain, has received $5.3 billion in loans and grants thus far from the federal government to offset lost business and higher expenses from the coronavirus pandemic. Tenet Healthcare Corp, the second-largest chain by revenue and beds, has disclosed more than $2 billion in similar loans and grants.

Meantime, the two chains, which own hundreds of hospitals, outpatient surgery centers and clinics, are telling investors that COVID-19 wasn’t as severe as expected in most of their markets, and that business is ramping back up. Shares in Tenet have doubled since the market lows in mid-March, while HCA shares have soared more than

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Levine Children’s Hospital benefit concert moving online with daily musical tributes

Seven years ago, after watching a friend’s child fight for his life, Charlotte musician Justin Fedor (Ancient Cities, New Familiars) spearheaded a tribute concert to benefit Levine Children’s Hospital. Since then, he’s held benefit tribute concerts for Levine twice a year at NoDa’s Neighborhood Theatre.

The semi-annual show was planned for later this month at Neighborhood, but with live-music clubs currently shuttered due to COVID-19, Fedor had to come up with an alternate plan: Following the trend, he’s taken the Tribute to Benefit online.

“We kept watching the calendar and we had to throw in the towel,” Fedor says.

The events typically feature Charlotte musicians playing the music of a certain artist, era, event, or group. In switching to a virtual event, he was able to expand the number and scope of artists.

“We decided, ‘Let’s make it even bigger and better than we could ever afford to do when

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