Inperson

US neas 150,000 deaths; Arizona protesters demand in-person classes; McDonald’s to close 200 US restaurants

President Donald Trump called the Senate Republican’s coronavirus economic stimulus package “semi-relevant” as the U.S. approaches 150,000 COVID-19 deaths Wednesday. The president told reporters Tuesday the $1 trillion package proposal has provisions that he doesn’t support. 

Florida, meanwhile, reported more than 9,000 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday and a new record of 186 deaths. In Oregon, Gov. Kate Brown announced students in most counties will likely not return to in-person classroom instruction this fall as counties must report 10 or fewer new cases per 100,000 residents over seven days.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee revealed his school reopening plan: people must quarantine for 10 days immediately after testing positive for COVID-19 or when symptoms begin.

Here are some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. is nearing 150,000 deaths and has reported over 4.3 million cases of the coronavirus, according to Johns Hopkins University. Worldwide, there have been over 660,000 deaths and

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Want to be a doctor? A lawyer? COVID-19 cases are rising, but these high-stakes exams are in-person only

Most facilities that offer standardized tests have canceled test dates or offered remote testing as COVID-19 cases rise. But two major tests are still offered only in-person.

The Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) and some states’ bar exams require sit-down testing, even in coronavirus hot spots. In the case of the bar, rooms can have hundreds of people.

The exams serve as high-stakes gateways for two of the country’s most prestigious, highest-pressure and lucrative fields: They determine who gets into medical school and whether law school graduates can be cleared to become attorneys.

Tests are typically held in-person to prevent cheating and protect the integrity of the exams. For test takers, in-person exams mean a decision between caution, as coronavirus cases in the USA surpass 4.1 million,  and achieving what for some has been a lifelong dream.

During the pandemic, the Association of American Medical Colleges canceled MCATs scheduled for

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Top PA Health Official ‘Optimistic’ For In-Person Fall Start

HARRISBURG, PA — Pennsylvania health officials affirmed Thursday that the state remains committed to reopening schools for in-person learning this fall, stressing that the actions we take now will determine the safety of the environment when children and teachers return to the classrooms.

Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Rachel Levine, speaking during a Thursday news conference, said the state maintains its goal “right now” is that schools will be open for in-person learning this fall. She noted many districts are planning varying degrees of in-person instruction, including hybrid or matrix models.

“We are going to stay positive and optimistic that there will be in-person school when school opens in August and we’ll be working towards that,” Levine said.

But, she stressed, there are things we can do now to ensure that goal happens, like wearing masks and following the governor’s mitigation guidelines.

“That’s why the mitigation efforts we have talked about

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Ford boots MPP from caucus and floats new idea for in-person classes

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 110,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and nearly 8,800 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 22

3:00 p.m.: Ontario Legislature adjourns after Ford boots MPP from caucus

The Ontario Legislature has adjourned after passing 18

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Online school? In-person? How parents are making their own fall 2020 decisions as COVID-19 squabbles continue

As officials play political football with K-12 school re-openings, parents such as Johanne Davis are formulating their own game plans for the fall.

“To exercise an abundance of caution, I’d like to keep my kids home with me where they’ll study online,” says Davis, a mother of three from Indian Land, South Carolina, one of countless states where COVID-19 cases have spiked in recent weeks.

“Health is the issue, not just for my children, but also school workers,” says Davis. “Teachers shouldn’t have to be frontline soldiers in this pandemic.”

Families across the nation are busy making their own calculations about whether to send children back to school. While Davis seems resolved, many parents are still mulling.

Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they're both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend a lot of next year studying remotely. But she acknowledges that hers is a privileged position not afforded to lower-income parents grappling with child care in order to go off to work.
Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they’re both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend
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Universities scramble to protect students from deportation under new ICE policy requiring in-person classes

The Trump administration has thrown colleges and universities across the country into confusion this week with the unexpected announcement that international students will have to leave the U.S. if their school does not offer in-person classes during the upcoming semester. 

In a press release Monday afternoon, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that, under a forthcoming temporary rule, foreign students currently attending a school that plans to operate entirely online during the fall semester will either have to transfer to a different school offering in-person classes, leave the country voluntarily or face possible deportation.

In addition, ICE said the State Department “will not issue visas to students enrolled in schools and/or programs that are fully online for the fall semester nor will U.S. Customs and Border Protection permit these students to enter the United States.”

Under normal circumstances, the U.S. does not grant student visas to people enrolled in online-only

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More In-Person Programs From The Forest Preserve District In July

WILL COUNTY, IL — As the state moves to Phase 4 of the governor’s Restore Illinois plan amid the coronavirus pandemic, the Forest Preserve District is offering more in-person programs for those who want to venture out, as well as additional online offerings for those who would rather enjoy entertaining and educational nature programs from the comfort of their homes.

Topics range from creatures and history to yoga and fitness. Here are the upcoming in-person and online programs:

In-person programs:

  • “Big Fish Contest,” July 1-Aug. 30 at Monee Reservoir. Bring your catch of the day to the visitor center to have it measured and photographed to be entered into the contest. Prizes valued at $100 will be awarded to biggest bass, catfish and panfish by length. One name will be drawn from all contestants for a grand prize winner. Free; ages 16 or older.

  • “Firefly Hike for Adults,” 8-10 p.m.

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District To Offer More In-Person, Virtual Programs

WILL COUNTY, IL — As the state moves to Phase 4 of the governor’s Restore Illinois plan amid the coronavirus pandemic, the Forest Preserve District is offering more in-person programs for those who want to venture out, as well as additional online offerings for those who would rather enjoy entertaining and educational nature programs from the comfort of their homes.

Topics range from creatures and history to yoga and fitness. Here are the upcoming in-person and online programs:

In-person programs:

  • “Big Fish Contest,” July 1-Aug. 30 at Monee Reservoir. Bring your catch of the day to the visitor center to have it measured and photographed to be entered into the contest. Prizes valued at $100 will be awarded to biggest bass, catfish and panfish by length. One name will be drawn from all contestants for a grand prize winner. Free; ages 16 or older.

  • “Firefly Hike for Adults,” 8-10 p.m.

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Ethical challenges loom over decisions to resume in-person college classes

<span class="caption">It's hard to social distance on campus.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/Colleges-Mental-Health/d3bf2a1fee084426b1a81853b29284e5/1/0" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Rick Bowmer">AP Photo/Rick Bowmer</a></span>
It’s hard to social distance on campus. AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

By early July, about 80% of U.S. campuses were planning to resume at least some in-person instruction, even as a growing numbers of faculty are voicing concerns about safety.

As Michael Sorrell, president of Paul Quinn College, argues, “Because we do not yet have the ability to bring students and staff back to campus while keeping them safe and healthy, we simply cannot return to business as usual.” Sorrell says that bringing students back in this context “constitutes an abdication of our moral responsibility as leaders.”

But this isn’t just about the responsibilities of individual campuses and university leaders to do what’s right. As a scholar of ethics, I believe it is unwise and unethical for government to leave schools largely on their own to navigate in deciding whether and how to open their campuses. The health risks are too

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Duke plans mass COVID-19 testing and mix of in-person and online classes this fall

Duke University is planning to bring students, faculty and staff back to campus in August with new safety precautions, including mass COVID-19 testing, adjusted classroom layouts and revised housing options in dorms and hotels.

The school also announced the plan for its student-athletes to return to campus, beginning with football players on July 12.

The news comes as state health officials say they are concerned about the recent increase in COVID-19 cases among younger adults.

“While the trends we see today are concerning,” Duke president Vince Price said in a statement, “we believe that the many safety precautions we are putting in place will allow us to responsibly continue along the path towards opening Duke’s fall 2020 semester on campus in August. We ask all members of the Duke community — students, parents, faculty and staff — to recognize and accept that we may need to change our plans based

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