kids

Parents are wary of giving kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

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Some wary parents won’t vaccinate kids, setting up future school showdowns

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

Read More

Many parents are hesitant to give their kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

Read More

How to reduce remote learning burnout in kids

How to reduce remote learning burnout in kids
How to reduce remote learning burnout in kids

Remote learning has children tethered to their screens. And while necessary to stop the spread of coronavirus, all this screen time can cause an unfortunate side effect in kids: remote learning burnout. 

Nancy (whose last name was withheld to protect her privacy) knows this phenomenon well. Last spring, when her daughter’s school went remote, her and her husband thought their daughter had adjusted well. During the school days, she would shut her door and not allow her parents in. They respected their elementary-school-aged daughter’s independence, assuming she was attending classes and getting her work done.

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In early June, though, she bounded down the stairs with a pair of scissors and her computer cord. She had cut the cord because she didn’t want to learn remotely anymore. Since then, she’s refused to be online except to play video games or watch

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Your Kids Probably Aren’t Getting Enough Sleep

Back-to-school season is in full swing! One of the best and easiest ways to help set your children up for success is incorporating the right amount of healthy sleep into their routine. September 14-20 is Student Sleep Health Week, organized by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), to highlight the importance of healthy sleep for students. As a physician specializing in sleep medicine, and a parent, I know how challenging it can be to get your children to want to sleep, but I also understand how important sleep is for their long-term health and success.

What’s keeping your children from getting enough sleep?

When children get sufficient sleep, it has a positive impact on grades, athletic performance and other daily activities. Yet, a new survey from the AASM shows that more than half of parents (57%) say that they have a child/teen who does not get enough sleep on

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Here’s how to help your kids pay attention to online school

School is back in session for students across Chicago. This year, since the pandemic has moved classes online, parents believe it’ll be harder than ever to manage children and keep them focused on schoolwork, according to a recent study.

In July, a Pew Research study found that half of parents with at least one child age 12 or younger, who may also have an older kid, believed the amount of time kids spent on devices could affect school performance. As for teens, a 2018 Pew Research study found 95% of teens, ages 13 to 17, have a smartphone and nearly half say they’re online “almost constantly.” Unfortunately, long hours of screen time has become mandatory with e-learning. But online games, social media and other tempting distractions could make it difficult to focus on class Zoom sessions. Below are tips from experts to ensure kids get the most out of school

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Learning pods help kids bridge social divide

Some parents who weren’t satisfied with the virtual end to the 2019-20 school year are turning to learning pods at the start of the 2020-21 school to ensure a bit of in-person education and socialization for their children.

The pods, sometimes called micro-schools, are often a group of students learning online in a shared learning space led by an adult — either a tutor paid to supervise and assist the students or a rotation of parents. 

Sometimes the pods are just for socializing, where a handful of students get together with, at times, a hired facilitator.

Regardless the purpose, trust among the families is key. “There is a lot of transparency in our pod, which is very crucial for this to even work,” Vikram Iyengar says about their four-child pod in Austin.

School at home: How to keep attending virtual classes from being a real pain in the neck

Learning

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Halloween Canceled? Businesses, Parents, Kids Say ‘No Way!’

ACROSS FLORIDA — Halloween may look and feel a bit different this year due to coronavirus safety protocols but a majority of parents polled say they feel it’s important for kids to celebrate the holiday and plan to take their children trick-or-treating this year.

A poll conducted by Morning Consult on behalf of the National Confectioners Association found that 63 percent of adults believe that people will find creative, fun and safe ways to celebrate the Halloween season this year.

Americans are looking forward to Halloween to add some normalcy and fun to what has been a serious and uncertain time. In a poll conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the NCA, 74 percent of millennial moms and young parents say that Halloween is more important than ever this year.

“Consumers report that they will be getting creative throughout the month of October to make sure that they

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This School Year, My Kids’ Mental Health Is My #1 Concern

Right before the pandemic hit, my two kids were beginning their last quarters of second grade and seventh grade. We had just moved to a new town at the beginning of the school year, and I finally felt as though my kids were adjusting, making friends, and acclimating to their new schools.

One of the reasons we had moved to this town (it’s actually the one I grew up in), is that I wanted to offer my kids a more rigorous and challenging learning environment. Both of my kids are nerdy and brainy, and my middle school son had been bored and restless for years in math and science classes where he already knew the material and needed an extra challenge.

I was never one to emphasize grades or academic achievement, but I wanted my kids to be appropriately challenged and excited by learning. And it seemed to be working.

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What It’s Like to Send Your Kids to College in a Pandemic

Photo credit: FatCamera
Photo credit: FatCamera

From Oprah Magazine

Four years ago, as our daughter prepared to leave for college, these were the questions on our minds:

Are microwaves allowed in the dorm?

How much time will we have to move her in?

What in Gods name is a bed topper?

Last month, as we logged onto a pre-college orientation for our son, here’s what parents asked:

How will you enforce mask-wearing for 40,000 students?

What if my child’s roommate does not believe in COVID?

How will students get to the hospital if needed?

What will you say to students who WILL get COVID?

An hour later, my husband and I shut our laptop and stared at each other. Until that moment, we backed our son’s choice, resting our faith in the school’s plan.

Now we had only one question left: what where we thinking? And were we insane?

Thousands of

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