Mental

Racism, police violence and the toll on Black mental health

The drumbeat of it all has seemed never ending.

Ongoing police violence against Black men and women has inflamed racial tensions. A global pandemic has killed Black people in disproportionately high numbers. And these extraordinary traumas come to a community whose mental and physical health already suffer because of anti-Black sentiment.

The suffocation of George Floyd under the knee of a white police officer in Minneapolis ignited a summer of national reckoning on race. Sacramento activist Jamilia Land summed up the anguish: “How do you heal a wound that never closes?”

In the Black community, living with those open wounds comes at a heavy mental and physical cost that researchers and mental health experts continue to assess.

La Tanya Takla, a psychologist and family therapist, focused solely on her private practice in Sacramento this summer as a growing number of African Americans sought her help to cope with the stress

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These Virtual Mental Health Resources for Black Women Can Make All the Difference

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Cosmopolitan

If you need mental health assistance right now, call the NAMI Helpline at 800-950-NAMI or text “NAMI” to 741741.

Black lives matter, and so does Black mental health. The Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health reports that African Americans are 10 percent more likely to experience serious psychological distress. At the same time, only 30 percent of African American adults with mental illnesses get help each year, which is below the U.S. average of 43 percent.

Racism and racial trauma continue to affect the mental well-being of Black people, who already face so many obstacles when it comes to receiving mental health treatment. As the National Alliance on Mental Illness stated, “Racism is a public health crisis.”

If you feel like the continued incidents of police brutality, the demoralizing legal proceedings like in Breonna Taylor’s case, and the lack of justice for

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Ex-BuzzFeed star Kelsey Darragh shared her mental health journey online. Now, she wants to be a resource.

Kelsey Darragh <p class="copyright">Sergio Garcia/@isergiogarcia</p>
Kelsey Darragh
  • Kelsey Darragh is a former video producer and development partner at BuzzFeed. She currently is a cast member on the E! show “Dating: No Filter.”

  • Her videos for BuzzFeed have received over 160 million views, averaging over 14 million views per video.

  • Darragh has dealt with mental illness and panic attacks for much of her life, leading her to write an upcoming book, “Don’t F*cking Panic: The Sh*t They Don’t Tell You in Therapy About Anxiety Disorders, Panic Attacks & Depression.”

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Kelsey Darragh is a comedian, video producer, podcaster, and now: author. She is best known for her numerous videos at BuzzFeed where she rose to the role of development partner. 

While she built up a following and fanbase for her playfulness and on-camera exuberance, Darragh was quietly dealing with major depressive disorder, panic attacks, and chronic pain. After opening

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Faked videos shore up false beliefs about Biden’s mental health

Joe Biden
Joe Biden

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks about climate change and the wildfires on the West Coast at the Delaware Museum of Natural History on September 14, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware. Biden has scheduled campaign stops in Florida, Pennsylvania and Minnesota later this week. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

From Ronald Reagan in 1984 to Bob Dole in 1996 and even Hillary Clinton in 2016, candidate health has become a common theme across recent U.S. presidential campaigns.

The issue is poised to take on added significance this fall. No matter who wins, the U.S. is set to inaugurate its oldest president by a wide margin.

The Trump campaign and its surrogates have seized on Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s age and have been painting him as mentally unfit for the presidency. Videos of Biden falling asleep during an interview, misspeaking about the dangers of “Joe Biden’s America” and appearing lost during a

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Police have shot people experiencing a mental health crisis. Who should you call instead?

Daniel Prude was experiencing a mental health crisis in March when Rochester, New York, police officers responding to a 911 call pinned him to the pavement while handcuffed and naked, suffocating him to death.

A month later, Nicolas Chavez, 27, was “having a mental breakdown” in Houston when he was shot 21 times, with 28 officers on the scene.

And last week, 13-year-old Linden Cameron, who has autism, was having an episode when officers shot him, leaving him with injuries to his shoulder, ankles, intestines and bladder.

Amid a nationwide movement for racial justice and police reform sparked by the recent killings of several Black men and women, many people have spoken out against police shootings of people experiencing mental health crises. While some are calling for departments to require more training in crisis intervention, others are promoting alternative emergency responder programs.

“A person shouldn’t lose their life because they’re

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Faked videos shore up false beliefs about Biden’s mental health

<span class="caption">Joe Biden faces a disinformation campaign promulgating the false notion that he is in cognitive decline.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/48554137807/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Gage Skidmore/Flickr">Gage Skidmore/Flickr</a>, <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:CC BY-SA">CC BY-SA</a></span>
Joe Biden faces a disinformation campaign promulgating the false notion that he is in cognitive decline. Gage Skidmore/Flickr, CC BY-SA

From Ronald Reagan in 1984 to Bob Dole in 1996 and even Hillary Clinton in 2016, candidate health has become a common theme across recent U.S. presidential campaigns.

The issue is poised to take on added significance this fall. No matter who wins, the U.S. is set to inaugurate its oldest president by a wide margin.

The Trump campaign and its surrogates have seized on Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s age and have been painting him as mentally unfit for the presidency. Videos of Biden falling asleep during an interview, misspeaking about the dangers of “Joe Biden’s America” and appearing lost during a campaign event have bolstered the belief, particularly among Trump supporters, that Biden is in cognitive decline.

There’s just one problem: None of these videos are what they seem,

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A mental health crisis brewing among South Asian immigrants in the West needs serious attention

Growing up in Texas, Priya Tahim felt like she didn’t have a voice. A second-generation immigrant and the middle daughter of South Asian and African parents, Tahim said sharing feelings was an alien concept in her household, causing her to struggle with her emotions.

Her grandfather’s death, while Tahim was a freshman in college, was the breaking point. “That hit me hard,” she said. “I was really close to him. If I was shown that it’s okay to talk about emotions and feel this way, then I probably wouldn’t have held in my anxiety for so long.”

It led her to seek counselling, but her American therapist found it difficult to understand why Tahim would have to take her parents’ permission to go out or obey their orders even when she didn’t want to. “Well, why don’t you just stand up for yourself?” her therapist demanded, unaware that submission is

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N.J. students may lose mental health services at schools

After giving birth almost two years ago, Nayeli Espinoza agonized over whether to drop out of her high school in Trenton, New Jersey, and get a job to support her newborn son.

She credits the School Based Youth Services Program at Trenton Central High School with allowing her to continue her education by helping her secure day care and giving her a place to talk about her problems with counselors.

“It was a blessing,” Espinoza, now 17, said Friday. “I was suffering a lot.”

But the program that thousands of New Jersey students, particularly those in lower-income districts and communities of color, consider a lifeline could be eliminated at the end of the month under the proposed state budget. The plan has sent students and their families scrambling to figure out how to get crucial services without it.

“We have this program that can help us be something for our

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How to manage your mental health during lockdown

The National Domestic Abuse helpline has seen a 25 per cent increase in calls since lockdown began (Getty)
The National Domestic Abuse helpline has seen a 25 per cent increase in calls since lockdown began (Getty)

On 23 March prime minister Boris Johnson implemented a nationwide UK lockdown, which saw people confined to their homes.

Only able to leave the house for a number of essential reasons: getting food or medicine, once-daily exercise or travelling to work as a key worker.

Although the restrictions are now starting to ease in England, many people will have spent weeks at home – and are still unable to meet friends and family.

A long period of isolation may well have been a necessary measure to protect public health against Covid-19 but it has been acknowledged that it could also have a detrimental impact on people’s mental health.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) released a mental health guide for people who are self-isolating saying: “This time of crisis is generating stress in

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What do Google searches tell us about our mental health?

Search engines store so much of our online activity that it’s possible our daily search patterns hold clues to our mental health.

“Google searches can really provide a lens into the way people are thinking and feeling,” Michael Birnbaum, M.D., a psychiatrist and assistant professor at Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, told ABC News.

More and more, online searches are becoming a primary resource for those seeking health-related information. This is especially true when it comes to stigmatized topics such as mental health, and new research suggests this digital data could prove to be an important tool for monitoring mental health monitoring.

MORE: Protecting Black mental health: How to cope, restore and ‘take your power back’

Birnbaum, also the director for Northwell Health’s Early Treatment Program, a clinical and research initiative for adolescents and young adults in the early stages of psychosis, partnered with researchers at Georgia Tech and Cornell

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