Reopening

Medical experts ask questions about school reopening before School Board meets Monday

A small group of medical experts met virtually Thursday to weigh in on whether Miami-Dade County Public Schools should open for in-person learning, possibly as soon as this month.

The School Board will hold a special meeting, also virtually, Monday at 11 a.m. to discuss the medical experts’ comments and that possible reopening.

Dr. Aileen Marty, an infectious disease professor at FIU’s Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, drove the conversation, asking direct questions about the district’s preparedness, from air quality and ventilation to how high-risk activities like music programs will be handled.

Marty said of the eight criteria laid out for reopening schools, all but two had been met. There is a lag in the reporting of school immunizations to the health department, said the school district’s chief of staff, Jaime Torrens, although Marty noted improvement in that area. She also expressed concerns over contact tracing.

A school district spokeswoman

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Millburn/Short Hills Parents Petition Against Online Reopening

MILLBURN, NJ — The Millburn schools are considered among the most competitive in New Jersey, consistently ranking in the top 10 for standardized test scores. But that doesn’t mean all of the parents are pleased — especially since the district announced two weeks ago that students will only be able to learn remotely until Nov. 9 at the earliest.

“Our family and some others relocated to the district specifically because of the reputation regarding its high-quality public schools,” wrote a parent in a petition posted on-line this week, signed by more than 300 parents as of Thursday morning. “However, based on last year’s experience and the poor quality of instruction due to remote learning and teachers inept in the online learning environment (Google Classroom), many are considering moving away.”

Like several nearby districts, the Millburn schools open Tuesday. And like at least 242 districts in New Jersey — more than

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Berkeley Gyms Transition Into New Normal Upon Reopening

BERKELEY, NJ — When The MAX Challenge of Berkeley closed last March, their members lost more than the physical space on 86 Route 9. They maintained classes through Zoom and eventually outdoors, but the situation gave owners Tracey and Mike Keogh new obstacles in maintaining everything the group fitness-focused gym offered.

“By closing the gym, a lot of people, even a lot of our members, went into this really tough place,” Tracey Keogh told Patch.

They felt more than ready once Governor Phil Murphy allowed them to reopen their facility Tuesday, and so did their members. Many New Jersey fitness centers will feature a “new normal” as gym goers return, including temperature checks, face masks and social distancing.

Each gym coped differently as they closed for nearly six months, but they all lacked one thing: certainty.

“We had no answers. There was no projected date,” said Jeff Padula, who owns

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Lacey-Area Gyms Transition Into New Normal Upon Reopening

LACEY, NJ — When The MAX Challenge of Lacey closed last March, their members lost more than the physical space on 800 Lacey Rd. They maintained classes through Zoom and eventually outdoors, but the situation gave owners Tracey and Mike Keogh new obstacles in maintaining everything the group fitness-focused gym offered.

“By closing the gym, a lot of people, even a lot of our members, went into this really tough place,” Tracey Keogh told Patch.

They felt more than ready once Governor Phil Murphy allowed them to reopen their facility Tuesday, and so did their members. Many New Jersey fitness centers will feature a “new normal” as gym goers return, including temperature checks, face masks and social distancing.

Each gym coped differently as they closed for nearly six months, but they all lacked one thing: certainty.

“We had no answers. There was no projected date,” said Jeff Padula, who owns

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How to Navigate a College Reopening

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One thing is clear as students return to some college and university campuses amid the coronavirus pandemic: It will be very tricky to get this right.

Public health experts are concerned that attempts to start in-person classes too soon and an overreliance on imperfect testing practices could lead students to underestimate the risks of getting infected on campus, potentially seeding new outbreaks and spreading COVID-19. That’s especially true with ongoing community spread of the virus in much of the country and difficulty controlling what precautions students take when they’re not in class. 

Some universities opened in-person classes only to suddenly go remote after clusters of coronavirus infections emerged or the number of students testing positive ticked up quickly. Other schools are delaying in-person returns until September or October, and then will limit in-person attendance or require negative test results

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Steve Bannon is busted, educators face schism over schools, and talk of reopening revives questions

It’s Monday, Aug. 24, and even the unexpected Florida story sometimes has us flummoxed.

Take the tale of two Florida men snagged, along with President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager and ideological point man, Steve Bannon. The three were arrested last week for fleecing hundreds of thousands of donors in an online crowdfunding campaign set up to privately finance construction of Trump’s border wall.

Some details you just can’t make up: Bannon, who was an early adviser to the president’s immigration strategy, was arrested on a yacht belonging to the Chinese billionaire Guo Wengui, a Communist Party dissident accused of working as a double agent for China’s government. Wengui is also a Mar-a-Lago member.

Others arrested were Brian Kolfage, of Miramar Beach in the Panhandle, who ran the “We Build the Wall” group and is alleged to have pocketed more than $350,000 to fund a lavish lifestyle, Andrew M. Badolato,

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Steve Bannon bust, schism over schools and reopening redux

It’s Monday, Aug. 24, and even the unexpected Florida story sometimes has us flummoxed.

Take the tale of two Florida men snagged, along with President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager and ideological point man, Steve Bannon. The three were arrested last week for fleecing hundreds of thousands of donors in an online crowdfunding campaign set up to privately finance construction of Trump’s border wall.

Some details you just can’t make up: Bannon, who was an early adviser to the president’s immigration strategy, was arrested on a yacht belonging to the Chinese billionaire Guo Wengui, a Communist Party dissident accused of working as a double agent for China’s government. Wengui is also a Mar-a-Lago member.

Others arrested were Brian Kolfage, of Miramar Beach in the Panhandle, who ran the “We Build the Wall” group and is alleged to have pocketed more than $350,000 to fund a lavish lifestyle, Andrew M. Badolato,

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Experts warn many schools should delay reopening, as data indicates virus resurgence across much of country

COVID-19 data projection dashboard and school reopening guidance released Thursday by the PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia seek to help school districts and parents make informed decisions and lead to sustained school reopenings.” data-reactid=”12″As communities across the country grapple with whether to bring students back into the classroom, a new COVID-19 data projection dashboard and school reopening guidance released Thursday by the PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia seek to help school districts and parents make informed decisions and lead to sustained school reopenings.

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia was granted access to Health and Human Services and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data pertaining to county positivity rates for the project. The hospital uses its projections to provide ongoing information to the federal coronavirus task force, and its data is used to update states with information about the spread of the virus within their various communities.

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North Carolina State University reports first cluster of cases; Hawaii delays tourism reopening; global cases top 22M

First, the University of North Carolina. Now, North Carolina State University.

A day after university officials in Chapel Hill decided to pivot to online classes after at least four clusters of outbreaks of COVID-19 in student living spaces, the Raleigh university reported its first cluster of positive cases that included some of its own students.

Also Tuesday, the University of Notre Dame said it was moving to online classes for two weeks in hopes that infections won’t surge.

Meanwhile, a new survey shows that parents with children who have switched to online learning say they have gone into debt paying for all of the at-home school expenses, including breakfast and lunch, during the pandemic.

Some significant developments:

  • The U.S. stock market closed at an all-time high Tuesday, staging a stunning turnaround from the darkest early days of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced he is writing a

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Notre Dame pauses in-person classes; Hawaii delays tourism reopening; Ohio to allow prep sports; 171K US deaths

A second major university is suspending classes right after the start of the new academic year due to a COVID-19 outbreak.

The University of Notre Dame paused in-person instruction Tuesday, a day after a similar move by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Notre Dame is putting the classes online for two weeks and not sending students home, apparently in hopes that the infections won’t grow worse.

But for those who believe enough people will become infected in the world to create “herd immunity,” the World Health Organization had bad news Tuesday.

A researcher said we’re still a long ways off from that point in which enough people have antibodies from the virus that it can halt the spread before vaccines become available, the Daily Mail reported. The big problem at the moment is younger persons, those in the 20s, 30s or 40s, with mild or no symptoms

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