School

School District Opts To Reopen Schools, Make Face Masks Mandatory

TAMPA, FL — The Hillsborough County superintendent of schools has announced that students and staff returning to public schools on Aug. 10 will be required to wear face masks.

After meeting with health officials, business leaders, teachers and school administrators, Superintendent Addison Davis said he believes masks are the best option at this time for keeping students and staff safe from the spread of the coronavirus on campus.

The district will provide three reusable face coverings for each student on the first day of school and three reusable face coverings for each staff member during back-to-school pre-planning.

“The CDC has identified face masks as one of the most effective tools in stopping the spread of COVID-19,” Davis said. “I believe face coverings is the best option we have for providing additional protection for everyone on our campuses.”

He said the county has already acquired 760,000 masks through purchases and donations.

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How one school district tends to students’ emotional health during coronavirus pandemic

SADDLE BROOK, N.J. — Three months ago, the Saddle Brook school district was making steady progress toward social and emotional learning as a part of a district initiative.

In-class yoga, mindfulness mantras and coping strategies for anxiety were part of the daily routine.

Then came the pandemic.

Virtual learning separated children from schoolmates and teachers at a time when the National Alliance on Mental Illness and other health experts were noting a surge in stress and depression. Next came the killing of George Floyd and racial tensions that heightened anxiety for many families. 

“I’m glad that we were in front of social and emotional learning, that we had this wellness initiative in place, because we had already been talking about it and doing it,” said Superintendent Danielle Shanley.

To address a complicated new reality, the entire faculty worked together to keep social and emotional learning at the forefront.  

“My concern

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An economist who collected coronavirus data from 841 childcare centers explains how parents should decide whether to send kids back to school

reopening schools
reopening schools

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  • As cities start opening up, parents face the tough decision of whether to send children who’ve been stuck at home for months to daycare, or school. 

  • To help parents with that decision, Emily Oster, an economist, collected coronavirus data from childcare centers that have stayed open during the pandemic. 

  • The data pointed to low transmission rates among both children and staff.

  • Still, Oster acknowledged that the childcare decision is a personal one and that there are “no easy answers.”

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Since the pandemic hit, Emily Oster — an economist who’s authored two books on parenting and pregnancy— has been using available data to respond to families’ pressing concerns about the coronavirus. She’s touched on topics like how to safely visit grandparents and the risks the virus poses in pregnant women.

Lately, Oster’s received an outpouring of questions from parents about whether to

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Fauci hopes for vaccine in early 2021; new ‘pandemic potential’ found in China; Arizona delays school openings

A new pandemic threat could be simmering in China while at home more states are tightening restrictions aimed at tamping down an alarming boom in coronavirus cases.

Arizona delayed the start for in-class learning for the 2020-21 school year. Oregon and Kansas are the latest states that will begin to require face masks in public.

“Modeling from the Oregon Health Authority shows that if we don’t take further action to reduce the spread of the disease, our hospitals could be overwhelmed by new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations within weeks,” Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said. “The choices every single one of us make in the coming days matter.”

In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy announced late Monday that the state would pause its planned reopening for indoor dining and banned smoking and drinking at Atlantic City casinos set to reopen this week.

And in China, researchers are concerned about a new

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Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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LAUSD board to decide whether to defund school police

Students and community members marched June 16 from the Miguel Contreras Learning Complex to L.A. Unified headquarters, where they urged the district to defund school police. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Students and community members marched June 16 from the Miguel Contreras Learning Complex to L.A. Unified headquarters, where they urged the district to defund school police. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

A uniformed and armed school police officer pepper-sprays students at a campus in Los Angeles. Is that excessive force, even police brutality, or a rare but justifiable de-escalation of an incident that otherwise could have become more dangerous?

As the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Board of Education debates the future of its 471-member police department Tuesday, two distinct interpretations are emerging from similar data on police involvement at schools: one points toward eliminating officers on campus; the other toward keeping them in place.

The seven-member L.A. Board of Education on Tuesday will consider three competing resolutions. Board member Monica Garcia has proposed essentially eliminating the department in a phased approach beginning July 1, 2021. Her plan has

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Kate Middleton Leads Online School Assembly About Feeling ‘a Little Bit Better’ During Lockdown

Kate Middleton is going back to school on Thursday — and she’s bringing a special message along with her.

The royal mom of three will lead a morning assembly for the Oak National Academy — an online classroom and resource hub created by teachers — to speak about the importance of mental wellbeing among children.

Oak National Academy has provided more than 12 million video lessons and given free resources to parents and teachers during lockdown. The service’s weekly assembly enables students across the U.K. to experience a key part of the normal school routine.

In her video speech,  Kate says, “Talking to someone, whether it’s a friend, family member, or teacher, is something you can do to make yourself feel that little bit better. And you can also play your part in helping others to feel better too, whether offering a friendly ear, or helping someone in need. Small

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What to Do if Your Medical School Is Online This Fall Due to Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic is a public health crisis that highlights the importance of the medical profession. During a time such as this one, when a contagious disease has spread across the world and humanity is collectively searching for a vaccine or cure, future physicians may feel a sense of urgency and want to begin training immediately.

However, the fight against the coronavirus relies upon social distancing measures, posing a challenge to newly admitted medical students. The upcoming fall semester for first-year medical students might differ from what it would have been if the virus outbreak had not emerged, since some or all coursework may need to be completed virtually, according to medical education experts. For instance, this May, Harvard Medical School announced that its fall 2020 classes for first-year medical students would “commence remotely.”

[Read: What the Coronavirus Pandemic Means for Premed Students.]

Nevertheless, many experts say that so

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Maison & Objet Moves Fall Fair Online, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin School to Relocate, and More News This Week

From significant business changes to noteworthy product launches, there’s always something new happening in the world of design. In this weekly roundup, AD PRO has everything you need to know.

In Pursuit of a More Just World

Nonprofit Rallies Street Artists for a Cause

Italian nonprofit Yourban 2030 has produced a global street art campaign designed to raise funds for Black Lives Matter initiatives and a number of NGOs, as well as to support those particularly impacted by the pandemic. The program, called Color 4 Action, features black-and-white works by artists including Shepard Fairey (known for the iconic Barack Obama “Hope” design), Ron English, Jeremy Fish, and Okuda. Donors who give $25 or more to one of the supported organizations receive a link to download the artists’ coloring book–style drawings.

Design Companies Continue to Step Up

On June 26, East Fork is set to stage its annual fundraiser for Campaign

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