schools

Parents are wary of giving kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

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Many parents are hesitant to give their kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

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Westfield Schools Say Student Coronavirus Cases May Be Connected

WESTFIELD, NJ — Westfield Schools Superintendent Margaret Dolan sent out revised information on Friday about the six confirmed cases of Westfield High School students with coronavirus that were announced Wednesday. Dolan had said Wednesday that WHS would go remote for two weeks, but that the cases were not connected.

On Friday, Dolan released a new letter to the school community saying that she had received more information and that the six WHS cases may be connected — and that a seventh case of a student with the virus had been reported.

None of the district’s other nine public schools are being affected by the two-week closure.

Dolan wrote in a letter Friday evening, “On Wednesday, based on initial reports provided to the Westfield Regional Health Department, the cases of six high school students who were exposed outside of school and tested positive for covid-19 appeared not to be linked. By

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21 more cases in Ontario schools, B.C. reports largest one-day spike

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

8,752 active COVID-19 cases in Canada: 140,867 diagnoses, 9,200 deaths and 122,915 recoveries (as of Sept. 17, 6:30 p.m. ET)

  • Alberta – 1,483 active cases (16,128 total cases, including 254 deaths, 14,379 resolved)

  • British Columbia – 1,705 active cases (7,663 total cases, 220 deaths, 5,719 resolved)

  • Manitoba – 293 active cases (1,500 total cases, 16 deaths, 1,191 resolved)

  • New Brunswick – 2 active cases (194 cases, 2 deaths, 190 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador – 1 active case (271 total cases, 3 deaths, 267 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories

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Schools should let children born prematurely start a year later, and not just for academic reasons

Francesca Segal, husband Gabe and their children Celeste and Raffaella in 2018 - Christopher Pledger
Francesca Segal, husband Gabe and their children Celeste and Raffaella in 2018 – Christopher Pledger

It’s that season again. Social media these past few weeks has been a chequerboard of glossy front doors, before which knock-kneed children in pinafores and long socks eye the camera with expressions varying from trepidation to triumph. Only fingertips are visible; blazers have clearly been bought to last the year.

Yes, It’s Back to School or, this year, Finally Back to School, after lockdown’s hellish feats of endurance, and a summer “holiday” of purgatorial length. The country unites in a sigh of relief that our children can once again be children, their fundamental right to an education restored. But no one is taking this restoration for granted.

Pandemic aside, I was always on course to be faintly hysterical this September, because my identical twin daughters are not returning but instead starting school for the first

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Polk County, Florida Bus Drivers Say Schools Are Keeping Them in the Dark on COVID-19

Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

MIAMI—Less than three weeks after schools reopened in central Florida’s Polk County, Mark couldn’t help but notice some students riding his bus slack off when it came to coronavirus safety precautions.

“The first week was fine,” said Mark, who like other bus drivers in the Polk County school system asked to use a pseudonym for fear of professional retaliation. “They were sanitizing their hands as they got on and off the bus and wore their masks properly. Now it’s a constant battle to make them do what they are supposed to do. They are getting tired of it.” 

Mark, whose route includes Lakeland Senior High, the Polk public school with the highest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 16, said last week he had students who flat-out refused to put on their masks. “It’s a little unnerving, but at the same time I

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N.J. students may lose mental health services at schools

After giving birth almost two years ago, Nayeli Espinoza agonized over whether to drop out of her high school in Trenton, New Jersey, and get a job to support her newborn son.

She credits the School Based Youth Services Program at Trenton Central High School with allowing her to continue her education by helping her secure day care and giving her a place to talk about her problems with counselors.

“It was a blessing,” Espinoza, now 17, said Friday. “I was suffering a lot.”

But the program that thousands of New Jersey students, particularly those in lower-income districts and communities of color, consider a lifeline could be eliminated at the end of the month under the proposed state budget. The plan has sent students and their families scrambling to figure out how to get crucial services without it.

“We have this program that can help us be something for our

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Schools that are mostly Black, Latino favor starting online

Missi Magness wanted her children back in school.

The parent of a first-grader and a sixth-grader who attend schools on Indianapolis’ southeast side struggled trying to oversee her children’s schooling while working from home this spring.

“They need the structure, they need the socialization, they just need to go,” said Magness. “‘I love you, but here’s your backpack, here’s your lunch … have a good day!’”

Many other local parents agreed. Now, their school district, Franklin Township — where two-thirds of the 10,000 students are white, as is Magness — has allowed younger children to return to school buildings full time.

But two districts over, it’s a different story. In Indianapolis Public Schools, where nearly three-quarters of about 26,000 students in traditional public schools are Black and Hispanic, the school year started virtually — despite relying on the same local health guidance as Franklin Township.

That dynamic is playing out

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Here’s What Would Happen If Schools Didn’t Reopen For a Full Year

The pandemic is making this the strangest start to a school year of a lifetime. Nothing’s for certain with America’s school openings. It’s up to states — and in many cases different school districts — to decide to open their doors. And with so much we don’t know about COVID-19, it’s a toss-up whether schools that open will stay open.

Unfortunately, this ambiguity about schools and safety isn’t temporary. In New Jersey and New York State, for instance, where COVID hit early and hard, infection rates and hospitalizations have eased enough to make it seem like the worst may be over. But COVID-19 is spiking in Europe, sparking fears of a second wave. Questions linger about children and the transmission of the virus. If something big, new, and bad happens, schools won’t stay open long.

It’s not a fun mental exercise, but we wondered: What would happen if schools

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Westfield Schools Reopen Tuesday; Town Updates Coronavirus Stats

WESTFIELD, NJ — The Westfield schools open Tuesday. There were no major updates to the reopening plan in the last few days, and it’s largely remained unchanged much from a month ago. Some students will alternate days in the buildings while others will learn remotely.

On Friday, Mayor Shelley Brindle sent out an update saying Westfield had reported four new coronavirus cases since Tuesday, bringing the total of resident cases to 368 since the first reported case in March.

Two of the reported cases were traced to college students who are out of state, she said.

“The Board of Health continues to work with the schools to provide guidance documents to help ensure a successful transition,” Brindle wrote. “They have also been working with the retail food establishments to help prepare them for indoor dining. I am extremely grateful for the ongoing work and diligence of Megan Avallone and her

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