teachers

Georgia School District to Teachers With Health Problems: Tough Luck

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty

Georgia teacher Samantha Mbozi hasn’t even entered a grocery store in the last six months. The 51-year-old just finished chemotherapy a year ago and is taking immunosuppressive drugs for two other illnesses. Her doctor told her strict quarantine could be a matter of life or death.

But late last month, the Gwinnett County School District gave her an ultimatum: Return to the classroom to teach in person, or stop teaching altogether.

<div class="inline-image__caption"> <p>"Gwinnett County teacher Samantha Mbozi"</p> </div> <div class="inline-image__credit"> Courtesy Samantha Mbozi </div>

“Gwinnett County teacher Samantha Mbozi”

Courtesy Samantha Mbozi

“I said, ‘It’s not like I don’t want to work. I’m a single parent, I don’t know where my paychecks are coming from after this month,’” said Mbozi, an immigrant from Guyana and a single mother of two. “They said, ‘There’s no work-from-home options. If you’re not in the building, you take leave.’”

As the school year begins, Georgia teachers with potentially

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A class of 100? COVID-19 plans overwhelming some teachers with huge virtual classes

PHOENIX — With family members at high risk to COVID-19, Norma Hernandez felt she had no choice but to keep her three kids at home for the school year, rather than send them to school in person.

It’s a decision most parents have had to contemplate this year, but the virtual option comes with worrisome trade-offs. In Hernandez’s case, her son’s fourth grade class in a virtual program in Gilbert, Arizona, has as many as 55 students, an “overwhelming” load for his teacher, she said.

“My son is lucky he has me at home,” she said. 

While some students are returning to classrooms around the country, others remain at home and could stay in the virtual classroom for the next year or even longer because of health concerns.

School districts have responded by launching online programs at an unprecedented scale. But parents, caregivers and educators say they’re dismayed by online

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This week, Labor Day parties stop in-person classes, young teachers die of COVID-19

College parties and a rise in COVID-19 infections have led to the cancellation of in-person classes this week. (Getty Images)
College parties and a rise in COVID-19 infections have led to the cancellation of in-person classes this week. (Getty Images)

Students are headed back to class amid the coronavirus pandemic, and to keep you posted on what’s unfolding throughout U.S. schools — K-12 as well as colleges — Yahoo Life is running a weekly wrap-up featuring news bites, interviews and updates on the ever-unfolding situation.

2 young teachers die from COVID-19 complications

A third-grade teacher at Windsor Elementary School in Columbia, S.C., died on Monday, days after her COVID-19 diagnosis. Music lover Demetria Bannister, 28, was known as “Windsor’s Songbird,” principal Denise Quickel said in a press release sent to Yahoo Life. Bannister last visited campus on Aug. 28 and began teaching remotely on Aug. 31. On Friday, Richland School District Two, of which Windsor Elementary School is a part, learned of her test results and began contact tracing and

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Teachers ‘painting a picture of the apocalypse,’ Ford says about back to school plan

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 5,600 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 129,000 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 2

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How Miami’s teachers trained each other

Stephanie Woolley-Larrea put on her expensive blue light-filtering glasses and the “back talk” lipstick she bought just for video-chat lessons like these.

The lesson: My School Online, the new platform that 19,200 Miami-Dade County Public Schools teachers will use to teach 275,000 students for the first time when school begins virtually Monday morning.

It was Saturday, and instead of being lost in a book, the Coral Reef Senior High language-arts teacher was conducting a Zoom lesson for her colleagues — even for the ones she didn’t really know — to get them ready for the first day of school, just 48 hours away.

“Allegedly after this weekend, I’m not working every weekend,” Woolley-Larrea said. She shared her screen with her colleagues and showed them how they’ll be teaching their own classes:

“That’s one of the things I like about this program. There’s a lot of ways to do the same

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Teachers’ Unions vs. the Poor

My children were meant to be back in school today, but they’re still home instead. They attend New York City’s excellent charter Success Academies charter schools, public schools that are mostly free of the city’s Department of Education and its associated bureaucracies and unions, all of which exist primarily to protect the interests of the adults who constitute them. At Success Academy, teaching comes first, so our students spend far more hours being instructed than the DOE students. For example, our schools open two weeks or so earlier than the DOE schools each year. The kids are happy to go back to see their friends, the parents get to return to their normal schedules, and more learning time benefits everyone.

Nearly all Success Academy schools are located within existing DOE school buildings, though. So our kids’ schools are locked up tight: The DOE won’t open them. Success Academy is

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Teachers, deemed ‘essential workers’ by White House, now likely to have to keep working after COVID exposure: ‘Risks lives,’ says union

Science teacher Camille Flournoy set out masks for her students on Aug. 18 in Twin Falls, Idaho. Flournoy and other teachers are now officially considered
Science teacher Camille Flournoy set out masks for her students on Aug. 18 in Twin Falls, Idaho. Flournoy and other teachers are now officially considered “essential workers.” (Photo: Drew Nash/Times-News via AP)

For America’s teachers, back-to-school season has been a whirlwind of learning new safety protocols and adjusting existing teaching structures — either for in-person learning or continued online classes. But for educators in states where in-person classes are moving forward, a new mandate from the White House is likely making the new school year seem even more daunting.

Teachers, as Vice President Mike Pence informed state governors earlier this week, will now be classified as “essential workers,” meaning they will be subject to guidelines under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “critical infrastructure” workforce. Previously a designation used for doctors, first responders and law enforcement, the distinction includes guidance that suggests those who are directly exposed to the

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‘It’s a frustrating period.’ Yet LAUSD teachers muster smiles on the first day of school

Gladys Alvarez, a fifth grade teacher at Manchester Avenue Elementary School in South Los Angeles, talks to her students via Zoom during a meet-and-greet on Wednesday. <span class=(Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times)” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/UZcw4q9rf.87yX4xye8l0Q–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ3MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/yYCcWma7vbRNRORLdHtk.g–~B/aD01NjA7dz04NDA7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/a41aef7ab645afa54a3bd1bd832aa814″ data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/UZcw4q9rf.87yX4xye8l0Q–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ3MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/yYCcWma7vbRNRORLdHtk.g–~B/aD01NjA7dz04NDA7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/a41aef7ab645afa54a3bd1bd832aa814″/
Gladys Alvarez, a fifth grade teacher at Manchester Avenue Elementary School in South Los Angeles, talks to her students via Zoom during a meet-and-greet on Wednesday. (Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times)

It wasn’t problem free and frustrations flared through the day, but as formal instruction began Thursday in Los Angeles public schools, students, parents and teachers attempted to project a positive face on the difficult work of distance-learning amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Also on Thursday, L.A. schools Supt. Austin Beutner provided new details on how the district’s nascent COVID-19 testing and contract tracing would work. These plans became slightly more pressing when a county health official suggested that positive health trends could soon permit the potential reopening of elementary schools.

In thousands of classrooms, hundreds of thousands of tiny faces appeared on screen for online classes, provoking worry among some teachers about how they

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B.C. won’t test asymptomatic teachers, CERB extended with new benefits coming

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 4,600 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 121,000 diagnoses so far) and 9,000 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

August 20

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Melrose Teachers Reveal Health, Safety Benchmarks For Return

MELROSE, MA — The union representing Melrose teachers said they want a two-week span of statewide positive test rates under 2 percent, no increase in COVID-19 cases in the city for two weeks and 48-hour test results, among other things, before returning to in-class instruction.

The Melrose Education Association said it is working with the Massachusetts Teachers Association on more specific benchmarks, and the following could change. As it stands, the requests are:

  • For educators and staff to return and remain in person, the positive test rate in Massachusetts should be no more than 2% over a 14-day period.

  • The City will have no increases in positive cases for fourteen (14) days before shifting from a full remote to a hybrid model.

  • Test results from labs must be happening within 48 hours in order for real time contact tracing and containment to occur.

  • Rate of transmission (RT) should be below

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