Time

The 20 best true crime podcasts to kill your free time

The best true crime podcasts are hard to listen to. They’re stories of often the most horrific moments of people’s lives, not entertainment. But, the best ones, and the reason we listen at all, are the podcasts with their eyes on justice. The ones forensically searching for answers even after official investigations have long since gone cold. There are also the true crime podcasts giving survivors a voice and those telling stories that we would otherwise have never known. 

So whether you want your stories from two LA comedians in My Favourite Murder, or directly from those who experienced them in the truly exceptional Criminal, the best true crime podcasts can deliver tales of survival and endurance in many different ways. 

It’s also more important than ever to talk about true crime and the systemic racism that enables so much of it in the world today. Many of the podcasts … Read More

Telehealth called a ‘silver lining’ of the COVID-19 pandemic. This time, it might stick

Telehealth use surged from 8% of Americans in December to 29% in May as primary care, mental health and specialists turned to remote care out of necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a UnitedHealth Group report.

Telehealth evangelists long have touted using high-speed Internet connections and a range of devices to link providers and patients for remote care. But regulatory hurdles and medicine’s conservative culture limited virtual checkups to largely minor conditions like sinus infections or unique circumstances such as connecting neurologists to rural hospitals that lack specialized care.

The pandemic lockdowns closed doctors offices and delayed non-emergency care for millions of Americans. Some clinics scrambled to acquire technology platforms to deliver remote care. Others began employing rarely used video programs to reach patients in their homes.

Remote visits among Medicare patients surged through the end of March, prompting Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Director Seema Verma to

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Life Time Fitness Reopens With Coronavirus Safety Protocols

ROMEOVILLE, IL — Life Time Fitness opened its doors Saturday as the state moved to Phase 4 of the governor’s reopening plan amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“It feels great to be open again. We have such amazing team members and members here, we really missed all of them when we were closed,” said Jason Fox, general manager. “We have received overwhelmingly positive responses from our members. They are so appreciative of the club being open again and have expressed gratitude for how clean we are keeping the club.”

As per the health directives, the center has taken the following measures to ensure safety of staff and members:

  • Increased spacing between equipment and within workout areas to allow for appropriate social distancing.

  • Constant, thorough cleaning of the club and overnight deep cleaning, using an EPA-registered, hospital-grade disinfectant and virucide that is known to be effective against emerging viral pathogens, including the

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US daily cases top 50,000 for first time; Trump hopes pandemic will ‘disappear’; NFL cuts back preseason schedule

The U.S. death toll from the pandemic may be tens of thousands higher than reported and the total number of U.S. cases surpassed 50,000 for the first time Wednesday.

The Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported 50,655 new cases, pushing the U.S. total to more than 2.6 million since the pandemic began six months ago. The daily death count was 645. But a study out this week determined there were 87,000 more deaths than expected in the U.S. from March 1 to April 25, based on the average from the previous five years. Only 65% of those deaths were directly attributed to COVID-19, suggesting the rest were linked to the pandemic but not ruled as the main cause, researchers say.

President Donald Trump, discussing the pandemic during a Fox Business interview, said he thinks “at some point, that’s going to sort of just disappear, I hope.”

Meanwhile, Vice President Mike Pence

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Nick Cordero’s Wife Amanda Kloots Says She ‘Cried All Day’ as He Remains in ICU: ‘I Broke Big Time’

Amanda Kloots is feeling very emotional amid her husband Nick Cordero’s recovery from coronavirus (COVID-19) complications.

On Monday night, Kloots shared that she had an “outburst” as the 41-year-old Broadway star spent his 89th day in the intensive care unit, writing in a lengthy note on her Instagram Stories: “I had a hard day today. I cried all day basically.”

In the post, the fitness instructor — who shares 12-month-old son Elvis Eduardo with Cordero — revealed that she even started questioning her faith during her breakdown.

“I got mad today too. I got mad at God. I’m praying and I have people all over the world praying. I said to my mom and dad, ‘Why can’t He throw us a bone. I’m sorry but I’m mad at him,’ ” she wrote. “I felt bad right after my outburst, but it needed to come out.”

amanda kloots/instagram

RELATED: Nick Cordero’s

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celebrating art in the time of coronavirus

In 1918, when the world was plagued by the Spanish flu, artists tried to make sense of the world around them. Edvard Munch made lonely self-portraits, while Egon Schiele drew his mentor Gustav Klimt on his deathbed. Photographers captured empty streets and ghostly cityscapes, like Morton Schamberg’s rooftop views from 1917, to hospitals shot by the California photojournalist, Edward A “Doc” Rogers.

With the Covid-19 pandemic still raging on, and the world in quarantine, the online exhibition Life During Wartime: Art in the Age of the Coronavirus hosted by the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, offers a window into what artists are up to right now.

Related: Signs of the times: how Douglas Coupland’s art came to life under coronavirus

By partly featuring artwork made since 5 March, the date the World Health Organization declared a global pandemic, it shows how artists have responded to the crisis –

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Helpful Tips for Anyone Experiencing Mental Health Issues for the First Time Right Now

If you’ve been feeling more anxious or depressed lately, you’re absolutely not alone. During stay-at-home orders, we have not only been sheltering in our homes all day but have also been cut off from spending time with loved ones, going out to eat, and enjoying many other simple pleasures that many of us use to take care of ourselves. Since our current political climate is so tense, we also spend a lot of time scanning the news and taking in a lot of intense information. The combination of living in chronic uncertainty and being isolated from friends and family is enough to make anybody’s mental health go south.

“The stress, anxiety, and depression that people are feeling right now in reaction to their environment is completely normal and understandable,” Amanda Sellers, a licensed psychologist based in Pennsylvania who specializes in women’s health and anxiety, tells Allure. “You’re having a

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If black lives matter, now is not the time to abandon the jury system

The new Lord Chief Justice, Sir Ian Burnett, at the Royal Courts of Justice: PA
The new Lord Chief Justice, Sir Ian Burnett, at the Royal Courts of Justice: PA

A few decades ago, I was lucky enough (or depending how you see it, unlucky enough) to perform jury service. It was at times a rather surreal experience – one that taught me as much about our social order as it did about our justice system – and how they influence each other. It felt a bit like a university group project but with random strangers instead of a group of like-minded colleagues.

The random people in my 12 included: a super-assertive white male investment banker, a born-again Christian Nigerian woman who at the start of deliberations tearfully remembered the biblical requirement not to judge (“lest thee be judged” she reliably informed us), a morally upstanding white hippie who would go outside to smoke weed during the breaks, three rather quiet women, multiple 50-something “my

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COVID-19 quarantines gave hackers time to perfect presidential election attacks: tech security CEO

Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince continues to warn that the coming presidential election may unleash hackers again just like in 2016 in a bid to influence the outcome.

The recent actions of these faceless bad actors look to be practicing their craft while quarantined at home because of COVID-19.

“I think as sports are canceled around the world, it’s getting hackers to spend more time focusing on how they can hack various things. And we see some versions of that, which are relatively harmless. For instance, we seen a big uptick in relatively unsophisticated attacks, which is actually similar to what we see when schools let out. I think there are a bunch of kids out there trying to test their chops if they can hack various systems. What has been concerning is especially over the last month, there has been a rise in nation states sponsored attacks targeting both political

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Millions Are Unemployed. Crises Abound. Is It Time To Guarantee Public Service Jobs?

“Is there a limit to how much we can care for each other?”

That’s the radical question at the heart of economist Pavlina Tcherneva’s timely new book, ”The Case for a Job Guarantee,” due to be published this month. 

The 128-page book went to print in December when the U.S. unemployment rate was near a postwar low of 3.5%. Yet that figure obscured the harsh realities of the economy it’s so often used to describe. Hallowed growth of the economy was less a rising tide than a wave that pummeled most and allowed a select few to surf. 

Average real incomes for the bottom 90% of families fell from 2009 to 2012, the first three years of the post-Great Recession recovery. By 2017, that average was 2.2% lower than in 1997. And as wages continued their decades-long stagnation, planet-heating emissions soared and storms and fires grew more

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