workers

College Roommates Launch Program to Help Essential Workers in Need: ‘Make a Meaningful Impact’

A group of students at Dartmouth College are doing their part to ensure that no frontline worker struggles to obtain essential items during the coronavirus pandemic — one donor match at a time.

Back in March, roommates Amy Guan and Rine Uhm helplessly watched as their spring semester and summer plans crumbled due to the pandemic.

“We ended up losing internships, I lost my in-person graduation, but at the same time, it was hard to be sad about these losses with everything else going around in the world,” Guan, 21, tells PEOPLE. “We would spend a lot of time reading the news and sharing stories that we found interesting about the risks and struggles that essential workers have been facing.”

“The more we read, the more we realized that there was a lack of access to basic necessities that a lot of other people might have lying around their house

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Dearfoams Launches Everyday Hero Sweepstakes, Ben Sherman Donates Masks to Health Care Workers + More

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July 2, 2020: Dearfoams is continuing its celebration of everyday heroes with today’s launch of “Nominate a Hero” — a sweepstakes that invites consumers to nominate a hero of the choice on Dearfoams.com for the chance to surprise them with a free pair of slippers. Nominations, which run through July 15, can include anyone from health-care workers to military service members, parents, teachers, store clerks, and more. According to the company, 200 winning heroes will be selected at random.  “We are so thrilled to continue our heroes’ campaign and commitment to our community by honoring and celebrating all of the heroes in our lives with the new limited-edition Hero Bear capsule collection,” said Tricia Bouras, president of Dearfoams. “We have been so inspired by the overwhelming response the campaign has received these past few months and want to continue honoring those individuals who

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Canada’s models show virus slowing but could surge, temporary foreign workers boosting Ontario cases

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 102,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,500 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

June 29

3:50 p.m.: ‘These recent outbreaks are concerning’

Dr. Barbara Yaffe, Ontario’s associate chief medical officer of health, spoke

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Orlando Workers Face Virus’s Fallout

An aerial view of an empty Magic Kingdom at Disney World in Orlando, Fla., May 6, 2020. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
An aerial view of an empty Magic Kingdom at Disney World in Orlando, Fla., May 6, 2020. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)

ORLANDO, Fla. — Four thousand phone calls.

To be more specific, Paul and Julia Cox figure they called the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity 4,480 times between April 19, when Walt Disney World furloughed them, and June 7, when glitches with their state and federal unemployment benefits were finally sorted out.

The Coxes are among the lucky ones. While most people have received one-time stimulus payments from the federal government, UNITE HERE, a union representing 30,000 hospitality workers in the Orlando area, recently said that at least 1,500 of its members had yet to receive any unemployment payments from the state. Florida has been one of the slowest states to process jobless claims, in part because its system was designed to be arduous.

One housekeeper in late May

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Why Some Remote Workers Might Get Hit by Surprise Taxes

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Following widespread office closures and stay-at-home orders, Americans are now working in new locations, sometimes in new states.

Other front-line workers have traveled to pandemic hot spots to help care for the sick and support the health care response. Still others are providing services, such as telemedicine, remotely.

These new work arrangements could ensnare unsuspecting individuals and businesses in new and complicated tax obligations.

A few states have helped to protect workers by issuing guidance that remote work during the pandemic will be considered in-office work for tax purposes.

However, because so few states have independently moved to protect taxpayers, Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., has proposed a federal bill that would limit states’ ability to tax the income of people temporarily working from a remote location during the pandemic and in the future.

Now is the time for states to step up and

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Model Halima Aden Designed Masks for Hijab-Wearing Frontline Workers amid Coronavirus Pandemic

Halima Aden is introducing an inclusive version of summer’s must-have accessory.

The 22-year-old model and activist teamed up with AI tech company Anywear earlier this month to design hijabs and turbans that come with matching face coverings for frontline healthcare workers amid the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Aden’s capsule launch is part of the Banding Together Project — a collection of fashion-forward headbands with buttons that secure face masks, created in partnership with Allure.

The Sports Illustrated model’s line includes tetra turbans ($52 each) in an assortment of pastel color-ways (plus one emerald and pink sequin design!), eight variations of hijab-and-mask sets ($45 each) and two face mask bundles ($40 each). According to the online product description, Aden’s designs feature “a built-in extender to clasp comfortably behind the head.”

And as a former hospital worker (who in 2019 became the first model to wear a hijab and burkini in

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Public health workers fighting COVID-19 are threatened, forced out of jobs

Emily Brown was stretched thin.

As the director of the Rio Grande County Public Health Department in rural Colorado, she was working 12- and 14-hour days, struggling to respond to the pandemic with only five full-time employees for more than 11,000 residents. Case counts were rising.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

She was already at odds with county commissioners, who were pushing to loosen public health restrictions in late May, against her advice. She had previously clashed with them over data releases and control and had haggled over a variance regarding reopening businesses.

But she reasoned that standing up for public health principles was worth it, even if she risked losing the job that allowed her to live close to her hometown and help her parents with their farm.

Then came the Facebook post: a photo of her and other health officials with comments about their weight and references

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Curfews Make Life Even Harder For Essential Workers

Medical personnel, grocery store employees and food delivery workers were already carrying more than their share of the burden of the novel coronavirus outbreak. Now they have something else to worry about.

Cities including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia and Washington have imposed curfews in recent days in response to the ongoing demonstrations against police violence around the nation. Essential workers are technically exempt from these restrictions, but no one on city streets after curfew has been exempt from the aggressive and brutal police response to the protests, which began after a Minneapolis police officer killed George Floyd.

The very people who are asked to put their lives at risk working during a pandemic ― often for low wages ― face the prospect of being arrested and detained on their way to or from work. The fact that laborers such as food delivery workers are disproportionately people

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Public health workers fighting virus face growing threats

Emily Brown was stretched thin.

As the director of the Rio Grande County Public Health Department in rural Colorado, she was working 12- and 14-hour days, struggling to respond to the pandemic with only five full-time employees for more than 11,000 residents. Case counts were rising.

She was already at odds with county commissioners, who were pushing to loosen public health restrictions in late May, against her advice. She had previously clashed with them over data releases and control and had haggled over a variance regarding reopening businesses.

But she reasoned that standing up for public health principles was worth it, even if she risked losing the job that allowed her to live close to her hometown and help her parents with their farm.

Then came the Facebook post: a photo of her and other health officials with comments about their weight and references to “armed citizens” and “bodies swinging

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