year

US surpasses 3 million cases, hits daily record of 60,021; Ryder Cup postponed 1 year

Hospitalizations continued to rise and ICU beds were quickly filling as the nation surpassed 3 million coronavirus cases Wednesday.

The stunning milestone hit less than six months after the first confirmed case was reported Jan. 21, in Everett, Washington. Tuesday saw a record 60,021 new cases as the nationwide surge showed no signs of ebbing.

The number of new daily cases has risen exponentially since the middle of last month, reaching a record high of 57,209 on July 3. At a Senate hearing last week, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testified that the U.S. is “going in the wrong direction” and that he “would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around.”

The virus has killed more than 130,000 Americans and put a strain on the health care system. In California, hospitalizations are

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Social media firms make $1bn a year from anti-vax followers, report says

Conspiracy theorists at Hyde Park Corner on 16 May 2020 in London: Getty
Conspiracy theorists at Hyde Park Corner on 16 May 2020 in London: Getty

Social media platforms are making up to $1bn a year from people following anti-vaccine misinformation that could cause “tens of thousands” of coronavirus deaths, researchers say.

The Centre for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) said the number of people viewing pages and posts claiming that a Covid-19 vaccine is unnecessary or would pose a health risk had risen dramatically during the pandemic.

Despite pledges by Facebook and others to crack down on harmful posts, a report found that at least 57 million users now follow anti-vaxxers on mainstream platforms across the UK and US – up 7.7 million since the start of the outbreak.

A YouGov poll suggested that almost one in five British adults say they would refuse the injection if it becomes available, and a further 15 per cent are unsure.

The research suggested that people

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How Beauty E-commerce Will Evolve Over the Next Year

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The coronavirus pandemic is to e-commerce sales what the bullet train was to rail travel — a transformational accelerator of a wide-spread behavior.

During the crisis, with all but nonessential brick-and-mortar stores closed, consumers had no choice but to buy online — some for the first time ever. But as stores start the laborious process of reopening, one thing is clear: For many people, the migration to e-commerce will be permanent — and the implications for selling beauty are significant.

“In the last three to four months, we’ve seen changes that we would have expected over the last three to four years,” says Oliver Wright, global lead of Accenture’s Consumer Goods practice. “Before COVID-19, about 20 to 30 percent of the population in most countries were hesitant to make purchases online. This group has been broken through, and as a result, we’re seeing

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24 Ways To Maximize Your Paycheck This Year

Paychecks come but they go even faster as expenses quickly mount. Though your pay may be limited, the ways you can creatively cut costs and maximize your money are not. If you need a little extra money, here are 24 ways to stretch your paycheck and make it bigger each month through a combination of cost-cutting ideas and methods to earn a little bit more money when you need it.

Last updated: Feb. 27, 2020

Put Your Budget in Writing

One of the best ways to squeeze more money out of your paycheck is to know what your current expenses are so you can decide where to trim your current spending. By writing down a budget, you give yourself a financial framework within which to work. If you can’t see what you’re spending, how can you know where to cut back?

Consolidate Your Debt

After looking at your finances, if

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A Year of Magical Thinking

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LONDON — It took Fabienne Lupo less than six weeks to transform the Watches & Wonders, an annual display of watch brands from Compagnie Financière Richemont, and other high-end makers into a digital rendezvous for exhibitors, their clients, and the media.

The gallerist Lyndsey Ingram crafted a lineup of virtual, selling exhibitions in just 10 days as her gallery was shutting down in London due to anti-COVID-19 quarantine measures. Stewart Clarke, creative director of the Edinburgh International Television Festival, one of the top media events in the U.K., is in the hot seat right now, thinking of ways to conjure the same buzz and spontaneity of a real live festival, online.

Masterpiece, the annual London fair that draws high-end art, jewelry, furniture, design and antiques galleries to the verdant grounds of Royal Hospital Chelsea, is taking place this week as an online event

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94 Money-Making Skills You Can Learn in Less Than a Year

Learning a new business skill is an excellent way to break into an industry, make yourself more attractive to employers or earn more money and responsibility in your current career. But between work, family and life, the thought of spending years in a classroom can be overwhelming. Fortunately, you don’t have to. It’s possible to learn many in-demand skills in less than a year — some in just a few weeks or months.

Potential earning increases for adding new skills to your resume are wide-ranging, but the more skill you can bring to the table for an employer, the better your advantage over other candidates, the higher your value in your industry and the more negotiating power you’ll have when discussing your wage or salary. Enrich your career and increase your paycheck with these 94 money-making skills and certifications.

Learning touch-typing or 10-key can improve accuracy when drafting documents and … Read More

The Greatest And Funniest Memes Of This Cursed Year, 2020

Even more than most other years, 2020 has been a time when we’ve experienced events through meme culture. Having spent almost half of the year to this point either indoors or worrying about whether we should be indoors, the glut of despairing jokes, coronavirus memes and Dominic Cummings tweetstorms have been incredibly comforting, even when they’ve been pressing on some miserable and infuriating moments.

The strange warping and flexing flow of time since about mid-March generally gets put down to lockdown, the stress of living through a pandemic and the overriding sense that we’ve been monkey-barring our way from one day to the next. But perhaps the realisation that, say, Olly Murs’s horrendous prank with the Pringles tube only happened in the middle of May, is jarring for reasons other than the fact that you’ve not been to the pub in three months.

We’ve been living more intensely online, and

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Reopening California schools is dangerous. But so is letting kids go a year without learning

Sean Brandlin, an eighth grade social studies teacher at El Segundo Middle School, stands in his classroom. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
Sean Brandlin, an eighth grade social studies teacher at El Segundo Middle School, stands in his classroom. (Los Angeles Times)

With COVID-19 cases at very low levels within its borders, Israel fully reopened its schools in mid-May. By the end of the month, 130 students at a Jerusalem high school had tested positive for the virus, setting off a flurry of quarantines for people who’d had physical contact with the students and the closure of dozens of schools.

This is the kind of outcome American parents dread as they contemplate sending their children back to school sometime this summer or fall.

It’s a troubling scenario, but so is the remote-learning experience of the past three months. The reality is, more kids will do better if schools reopen than if they continue online-only classes. But regardless of how we proceed, we must do better.

With little direction or help from federal

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