Pat Quinn, Who Promoted A.L.S. Ice Bucket Challenge, Dies at 37

Pat Quinn, who helped raise $220 million to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or A.L.S., by

Pat Quinn, who helped raise $220 million to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or A.L.S., by promoting the Ice Bucket Challenge in 2014, died on Sunday, seven years after he learned he had the disease. He was 37.

His death, at St. John’s Riverside Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y., was confirmed by the A.L.S. Association and in a post on his official Facebook page.

Mr. Quinn did not create the challenge, in which people dumped buckets of ice water on their heads while pledging to donate money to fight A.L.S. But he and his friend Pete Frates, who also had A.L.S., are credited with amplifying it and helping to make it a sensation in the summer and fall of 2014, raising tens of millions of dollars for research and, perhaps nearly as important, wider awareness of the disease.

“Pat changed the trajectory of the fight against A.L.S. forever,” Calaneet Balas, the president and chief executive of the A.L.S. Association, said in a statement on Sunday. “He inspired millions to get involved and care about people who are living with A.L.S.”

Speaking to an audience in Boston last year for the fifth anniversary of the challenge, Mr. Quinn said the campaign “connected with a sweet left hook to the jaw of A.L.S. and shook the disease up, but by no means is this fight over.”

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