Urgent warning over TikTok frozen honey hack trend as dietitians say it could cause explosive diarrhea and cramps

TIKTOK users have been warned not to do the frozen honey hack trend as dietitians…

TIKTOK users have been warned not to do the frozen honey hack trend as dietitians say it could cause explosive diarrhea and cramps.

The craze involves freezing a plastic bottle of honey for hours until it becomes a solid shaft that oozes out of the bottle when you squeeze and eat it.

Doctors have warned TikTok users not to attempt this 'crazy' trend

5

Doctors have warned TikTok users not to attempt this ‘crazy’ trendCredit: TikTok/ Lalaleluu
It can cause diarrhoea, stomach cramps, bloating, and even botulism if it's raw

5

It can cause diarrhoea, stomach cramps, bloating, and even botulism if it’s rawCredit: TikTok/daveyrz
Users shared their videos under the hashtag #FrozenHoney

5

Users shared their videos under the hashtag #FrozenHoneyCredit: TikTok/Avery Cyrus

One user called @feelgoodfoodie described how she “froze some honey in a small plastic bottle to see what this new honey trend is all about. Look how cool this looks,” noting that her family said it was “so good.”

TikTok enthusiasts have been using the #FrozenHoney hashtag to share videos of them gobbling the substance – but health experts have weighed in and said it’s not a good idea.

Dietitians pointed out that consuming too much of this hardened syrup could cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, bloating, and even botulism if it’s raw when around one in 3 people have dietary fructose intolerance.

The cells in their intestines cannot absorb fructose the way they should, which can cause significant issues, Cleveland Clinic dietitian Kristin Kirkpatrick told NBC News.

Kilpatrick warned that people with this fructose malabsorption may experience “awful diarrhea, stomach pain and things like that because they’re not breaking it down correctly.”

‘CRAZY’ CRAZE

Lisa Young, an adjunct professor of nutrition at New York University’s Steinhardt School, also said the trend may trigger problems.

“It’s thought to be fine in adults, but a large load might potentially be problematic,” Young explained.

Kirkpatrick pointed out that it all depends on how much honey they’re consuming but noted that this experiment wasn’t a good idea.

“Honey is great, but having it in small amounts to sweeten is really a healthy relationship with food, [but] using it to get a lot of followers and a lot of attention and having it in excess amounts is crazy.”

Some users claimed they “felt sick” afterwards or had to make a run for the bathroom, while others urged their dentist not to look at it, given the amount of sugar.

TROUBLING TRENDS

The latest troubling TikTok trend comes after a 12-year-old boy died in Oklahoma last month after reportedly attempting the viral TikTok “blackout challenge” only months after it left another 12-year-old with brain damage.

“The preliminary investigation leads detectives to believe this incident was not a suicide attempt, but that of a TikTok Challenge or otherwise known as the ‘Black Out’ Challenge, gone wrong,” cops said in a statement to KFOR.

Bethany Police issued a warning on Tuesday, urging parents to ensure they know what their children are doing on social media.

“We would like to warn parents to stay involved with their children and take the time to look what they are doing on social media. Now more than ever due to the lockdowns, kids are bored and looking to occupy their time.”

A boy in Massachusetts died following an attempt at the challenge, while another 12-year-old boy in Colorado remained on life support for 19 days after attempting the trend in April.

‘SCRUTINIZE’ KIDS

Joshua Haileyesus was left brain dead after he was found by his twin brother passed out on his bathroom floor on March 22.

TikTok condemned the “blackout challenge” earlier this year after the death of a 10-year-old girl in Italy and said kids’ use of social media must be “scrutinized” by their parents.

Meanwhile, back in April, doctors were forced to issue a warning over the viral “sunscreen contouring” trend that can cause cancer.

The trend went viral after Los Angeles-based model Eli Withrow, 24, posted about it saying it left her “feeling snatched all summer.”

Posting to her 54.6K followers she said she puts “a base sunscreen of SPF 30 on and SPF 90 on all the spots that you would put highlighter on, the sun will contour your face where you put bronzer.”

Dr Simran Deo at Online Doctor, Zava, said that UV rays from the sun can cause significant and irreversible damage to the skin – especially for those with fair skin.

“It can result in damage of the skin cells leading to skin cancer and pre-cancerous changes, as well as having an effect on your immunity”, she told the Daily Mail.

'A large load [of honey] might potentially be problematic,' one expert warned

5

‘A large load [of honey] might potentially be problematic,’ one expert warnedCredit: TikTok/Feel Good Foodie
Users have been freezing honey in the fridge

5

Users have been freezing honey in the fridgeCredit: TikTok/daveyrz

Source Article