Day: June 27, 2020

The CDC Added 3 More COVID-19 Symptoms To Its Official List

As the number of new COVID-19 cases increase, so does the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) list of coronavirus symptoms.

The CDC recently added three more symptoms on its “Symptoms of Coronavirus” list, bringing the total number of possible symptoms to 12. The newly added symptoms (though, not necessarily “new” symptoms as they’ve been pointed out since the beginning of the pandemic) are congestion or runny nose, nausea, and diarrhea. The last time the CDC updated its list was in late April, with the addition of chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new loss of taste or smell.

Now, the list of possible symptoms includes: fever, chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, and diarrhea.

“People with COVID-19 have had

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Iconic Hollywood Restaurant Musso & Frank Reopens

HOLLYWOOD, CA — Iconic Hollywood restaurant Musso & Frank Grill reopened Friday, more than three months after closing due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The restaurant at 6667 Hollywood Blvd. closed following a March 15 order from Mayor Eric Garcetti banning restaurants and bars from serving food and alcohol.

The restaurant will offer its full menu and the only changes customers will see “are those that ensure the health and safety of everyone who walks through our doors,” said Mark Echeverria, the restaurant’s chief operating officer and chief financial officer and a fourth-generation member of the family of owners.

The health and safety initiatives being undertaken at the restaurant include:

— Before guests arrive, they will be asked to check themselves for COVID-19 symptoms. If they display any symptoms, they will be asked to go home;

— In the parking lot, Musso & Frank will have an assisted parking system, not

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Orlando Workers Face Virus’s Fallout

An aerial view of an empty Magic Kingdom at Disney World in Orlando, Fla., May 6, 2020. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
An aerial view of an empty Magic Kingdom at Disney World in Orlando, Fla., May 6, 2020. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)

ORLANDO, Fla. — Four thousand phone calls.

To be more specific, Paul and Julia Cox figure they called the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity 4,480 times between April 19, when Walt Disney World furloughed them, and June 7, when glitches with their state and federal unemployment benefits were finally sorted out.

The Coxes are among the lucky ones. While most people have received one-time stimulus payments from the federal government, UNITE HERE, a union representing 30,000 hospitality workers in the Orlando area, recently said that at least 1,500 of its members had yet to receive any unemployment payments from the state. Florida has been one of the slowest states to process jobless claims, in part because its system was designed to be arduous.

One housekeeper in late May

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7 ways cybercrime is evolving amid the coronavirus pandemic

For many cybercriminals, the global coronavirus pandemic has been a golden opportunity for fraud.

And we haven’t even seen the worst of it yet.

Scammers love crises. From the criminal’s perspective, few things are better for cultivating new victims than a natural disaster or a social crisis.

Why? Because scams work best when people aren’t thinking clearly. When people are highly emotional, scared or anxious, as they usually are during a crisis, they tend to make impulsive decisions. This is exactly what the scammers want.

Read more: What to do if your identity has been stolen

A woman uses a smartphone and a mobilephone in front of a laptop on April 3, 2019. (Photo by ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP via Getty Images)

Cybercriminals are opportunists, and during a “normal” crisis — like a natural disaster — the opportunities are often short-lived. But the current crisis (or, rather, crises) is different.

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5 Reasons to Get an HIV Test Today

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should be tested for HIV at least once in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Despite the CDC’s sweeping recommendation, fewer than 40 percent of adults in the U.S. have ever gotten an HIV test, according to a study published last year. And even though HIV testing is becoming more common in emergency rooms and community health centers, there has been no increase in testing at doctors’ offices, the CDC reported in a June 26 study. 

In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, HIV may not be top of mind. But “HIV and sexual health services are always needed,” says Omi Singh, M.P.H., the director of testing at GMHC, an HIV care and advocacy nonprofit. “The current pandemic has not stopped that.”

HIV, the virus

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Puppy scams thrive amid coronavirus pandemic as Americans seek company: Illegal Tender podcast

This is part 1 of Yahoo Finance’s Illegal Tender podcast Season 6 ‘The Puppy Crimes of Quarantine’. Listen to the series here. 

In the early days and weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans acted on equal parts fear and necessity converting their homes into offices, gyms, and schools.

Those who were healthy found themselves restless and in search of a distraction. People painted rooms different colors and baked banana bread, and some saw an opportune time to get a puppy. 

Would-be dog parents took to the internet in droves searching for new dogs to adopt. Pandemic puppies were such hot commodities that reports of possible shortages of adoptable dogs first made headlines in late March.

Online dog scammers, which typically work during the winter holidays, came out in full force to exploit the pandemic. With stolen images or stock photos, they create online profiles of dogs, communicate with potential adopters, … Read More

Minneapolis council to vote on abolishing police; Elijah McClain’s death investigation reopened

The Minneapolis city council took a first step Friday toward abolishing the city’s police department, a move protesters have repeatedly called for during the month since George Floyd was killed as one of the city’s officers knelt on his neck.

Nationally, the House passed its own police reform package that would end certain legal protections for officers accused of misconduct and ban chokeholds. 

Meanwhile, protests continue around the U.S., including in Kentucky where social justice groups continue to demand the officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s death be arrested. In Seattle, some protesters in the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone or Capitol Hill Organized Protest said they will stay despite the mayor’s plan to wind down the zone. 

There was also a standoff between protesters and authorities at the Emancipation Memorial in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Protesters had vowed to tear down the statue, but law enforcement responded with police presence and

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Miami leaders have a few models for reopening schools. It’s up to parents to decide.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ plans keep shifting as coronavirus cases continue to spike exponentially.

The school district was due to announce its plan to reopen schools for the 2020-21 school year on Wednesday but postponed to squeeze in one more meeting with its work group of medical professionals and community members. The full plan will be presented at a special School Board meeting Wednesday, July 1.

“After the last Zoom call, as a parent, grandparent, I was extremely nervous and upset,” said Eileen Segal of the Family & Community Involvement Advisory Committee on Wednesday. “After listening today I feel a lot calmer.”

On Friday, the 23-member work group met virtually again to go over a revised draft plan. Seven models of how instruction would take place were whittled to four: A daily attendance at the schoolhouse model with reduced class sizes and social distancing; two hybrid models of in-person and

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Inside One Mother’s Fight To Help Her Kids Get An Education During Coronavirus

(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)
(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)

This story about rural education was produced as part of the series Critical Condition: The Students the Pandemic Hit Hardest, reported by HuffPost and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

Terri Johnson willed her body not to show signs of impatience. She had been sitting in the parking lot of a McDonald’s in Greenville, Mississippi, for more than an hour, so her oldest child, Kentiona, could connect to the building’s Wi-Fi, something they didn’t have at home. Johnson didn’t want her daughter to feel rushed. 

Kentiona, 16, was in the passenger seat using the car’s dashboard as a makeshift desk. Her high school had recently closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic and shifted to distance learning. Kentiona’s persuasive essay for her English class had brought them to the McDonald’s on that third Friday

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Massachusetts latest state to give go-ahead for practices. Here’s where other states stand.

It’s that time of year when NFL teams should be heading into their final month of operations before wrapping the offseason with a full squad veteran minicamp in mid-June. Instead, the league’s power brokers are still trying to figure out when franchises across the country will be allowed to resume their operations — and if there is any hope of training camps or the regular season starting on time.

Head coaches may soon return to facilities with minicamps to potentially follow in June, according to sources. That comes on the heels of many states’ push to reopen, including notable announcements from California Gov. Gavin Newsom, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker and New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy.

Baker said that on Monday he’ll issue an order allowing pro sports teams within his state to “begin practicing at their facilities in compliance with the health and safety rules that all the leagues are

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