Coronavirus

NC not doing enough to protect immigrant farmworkers from coronavirus, advocates say

Reported coronavirus cases are rising among seasonal farmworkers living in migrant worker housing, a group setting like nursing homes that the state is watching.

On Tuesday, 128 new COVID-19 cases across four farms were reported through June, according to the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services.

That was more than double the 49 cases previously reported by The News & Observer. They bring the total number of infected farmworkers living in the camps to 177.

Six farms had active outbreaks in June compared to five active outbreaks reported in May. DHHS defines an outbreak as more than two cases but is only reporting them at facilities with at least 10 residents.

The cases reported are among seasonal immigrant farmworkers from Mexico who come to work in the United States on a temporary visa and live in grower-provided housing. Other infected workers who live in private residences not on farm

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As coronavirus surge continues, L.A. unveils color-coded system to assess infection risk

Customers wearing masks line up to go inside Zara on the 3rd Street Promenade in Santa Monica. <span class="copyright">(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Customers wearing masks line up to go inside Zara on the 3rd Street Promenade in Santa Monica. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

As coronavirus cases continue to mushroom throughout the state, Los Angeles has unveiled a new color-coded system to assess and report the risk of infection.

The online indicator, which Mayor Eric Garcetti unveiled Wednesday, is broken into four categories — red, orange, yellow and green — each representing different threat levels.

“Information and data on the threat helps us all inform our behavior, guides us to better days,” Garcetti said.

As of Thursday morning, L.A.’s indicator was orange, meaning that the risk of infection remains very high, according to Garcetti.

“When the indicator is orange, you want to stay at home as often as possible … and only leave for essential activities like going to work or going to the market,” he said. “And you should assume

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How 5 Serious Athletes Are Handling the Coronavirus Mask Dilemma

If someone were to tell you a year ago that you’d be Googling “best mask for running” or “best mask for working out” in the summer of 2020, you likely would’ve looked at them sideways. And yet here we are: face masks have become an essential part of everyday wear for anyone leaving the house. Many states require you to wear a mask in public if you can’t practice social distancing and the CDC recommends it. While it’s not strictly necessary for outdoor activity if you’re able to stay well-distanced from other people the entire time you’re out, lots of times—say, a run somewhere that is even a little bit crowded—that’s not possible.

But here’s nothing fun about covering your face while you’re working out. Breathing while you’re pushing your limits was already hard enough—going hard while breathing through a barrier feels downright impossible. And it’s only getting worse as

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When coronavirus threatened to close this food court restaurant, neighbors rallied to save it

DES MOINES, Iowa – From her padded stool perch in the corner of her restaurant, Vietnam Cafe, owner Brenda Tran reigns over the food court – part mama bear, part perpetual party host.

On a typical day, Tran watches new customers settle into tables and chow down, sometimes running into the dining room to hold impromptu lessons on the finer points of Vietnamese cuisine. Swirl your pho noodles like spaghetti! Lean down and slurp the broth!

She chats with her “mall walkers” as they nosh on her special Vietnamese egg sandwiches. After losing her father a decade ago, she considers them her “American parents,” an honor they take to heart.

She beckons over “the kids,” teens either suspended or cutting class from the local high school. She tells them her story, how she survived the Vietnam War and came to Iowa as a refugee, not knowing a lick of English

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Life Time Fitness Reopens With Coronavirus Safety Protocols

ROMEOVILLE, IL — Life Time Fitness opened its doors Saturday as the state moved to Phase 4 of the governor’s reopening plan amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“It feels great to be open again. We have such amazing team members and members here, we really missed all of them when we were closed,” said Jason Fox, general manager. “We have received overwhelmingly positive responses from our members. They are so appreciative of the club being open again and have expressed gratitude for how clean we are keeping the club.”

As per the health directives, the center has taken the following measures to ensure safety of staff and members:

  • Increased spacing between equipment and within workout areas to allow for appropriate social distancing.

  • Constant, thorough cleaning of the club and overnight deep cleaning, using an EPA-registered, hospital-grade disinfectant and virucide that is known to be effective against emerging viral pathogens, including the

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Just 8% of colleges are keeping classes online this fall, but more may join them as coronavirus outbreaks surge. Here’s the list so far.

A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.
A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.

Mike Blake/Reuters

After a semester of remote courses and online graduations, some colleges and universities are deciding not to return for in-person classes this fall.

California State University, the largest four-year public university system in the US, has cancelled in-person classes for the fall semester at all 23 of its campuses. Instead, classes will take place almost exclusively online, Chancellor Timothy White announced in May.

“Our university, when open without restrictions and fully in person… is a place where over 500,000 people come together in close and vibrant proximity,” White said at the meeting, according to the Los Angeles Times. “That approach sadly just isn’t in the cards now.”

Six of Harvard’s graduate and professional

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Experts Beg Americans To Take Coronavirus Seriously Or Face Further Disaster

President Donald Trump did not appear overly concerned Wednesday about the resurging coronavirus pandemic. “I think we’re going to be very good with the coronavirus. I think that at some point that’s going to sort of just disappear, I hope,” he said in an interview with Fox Business. 

The White House claims the president is the “most informed person on the planet,” but Trump’s comments conflict with increasingly urgent warnings from health experts — including those in Trump’s administration — that the virus is spreading at alarming rates and that, without immediate intervention, Americans will continue to get sick and die. 

“I would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 cases a day if this does not turn around,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said Tuesday. 

Earlier this week, a high-ranking official at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a

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Couple Married for 53 Years Hold Hands as They Die of Coronavirus on the Same Day

A couple who were married for more than half a century reportedly succumbed to coronavirus complications on the same day in Texas.

According to CNN, Betty and Curtis Tarpley, 80 and 79, died within an hour of each other on June 18 and held hands during their final minutes together.

The couple’s son, Tim Tarpley, told the network that Betty showed symptoms of the deadly disease just before she was taken to Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth on June 9. Curtis was admitted to the same hospital just two days later.

Tarpley said Betty phoned both him and his sister, telling them she was at peace with dying as her condition continued to decline.

“I just screamed, ‘No!’ I was like, ‘I’ve got too much, too many other things to do in this life that I want to show you, and I’m not ready,'” he recalled to CNN.

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Republicans Pushed To Reopen The Economy. Now Coronavirus Cases Are Spiking Again.

Republicans repeatedly urged states to lift their lockdown orders, arguing that a gradual return to normal was crucial to the long-term health and stability of the U.S. economy. 

Now, coronavirus infections are surging nationwide, forcing some states to shutter all over again in hopes of containing the spread of a disease that has killed over 120,000 Americans and counting.

“I would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 cases a day if this does not turn around, so I am very concerned,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, warned at a Senate hearing on the coronavirus on Tuesday.

Officials in Arizona, Texas, Florida, South Carolina and California are reporting record numbers of new cases each day, attributing the rise mostly to young people who are ignoring safety recommendations. The situation is particularly concerning in Arizona, where health officials are reporting a surge in hospitalizations due

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An economist who collected coronavirus data from 841 childcare centers explains how parents should decide whether to send kids back to school

reopening schools
reopening schools

Getty

  • As cities start opening up, parents face the tough decision of whether to send children who’ve been stuck at home for months to daycare, or school. 

  • To help parents with that decision, Emily Oster, an economist, collected coronavirus data from childcare centers that have stayed open during the pandemic. 

  • The data pointed to low transmission rates among both children and staff.

  • Still, Oster acknowledged that the childcare decision is a personal one and that there are “no easy answers.”

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Since the pandemic hit, Emily Oster — an economist who’s authored two books on parenting and pregnancy— has been using available data to respond to families’ pressing concerns about the coronavirus. She’s touched on topics like how to safely visit grandparents and the risks the virus poses in pregnant women.

Lately, Oster’s received an outpouring of questions from parents about whether to

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